[HOT] Request for help/guidance on a project to test diarrheal disease interventions in Kendua Sub-District, Bangladesh.

Ahasanul Hoque hoque.ahasan at gmail.com
Mon Feb 2 05:22:39 UTC 2015


Hi Stace and Mikel,

FYI, Kendua is a sub district (upazila) of Netrokona District. Kendua also
divided in 14 subdivision (13 unions and 1 Paurashava/municipalty). Here I
have attached the boundaries and kmz of all for your convenience. I tried
to upload in umap but couldnt.  Hope Mikel could do it for me.

Best regards

Ahasan

.....................................................................................
Ahasanul Hoque

*GIS & Environmental Data Mgt SpecialistWSP, **The World Bank.*
MSc in RS and GIS | AIT, Thailand. MSc. in Env. Science| KU, Bangladesh.
*Diploma in Disaster Mgt & Humanitarian Response* |
Uni of Hawai-USA, UNU, Keio& Okayama - Japan; AIT-Thailand*.*
*Contact: *hoque.ahasan at gmail.com; ahasan_17 at yahoo.com <ahasan_17 at gmail.com>
 |
Web: *ahasanulhoque.com* <http://ahasanulhoque.com/>
*Skype: *ahasan4u | *Linkedin: **http://tinyurl.com/njg3xsp
<http://tinyurl.com/njg3xsp> *


On Mon, Feb 2, 2015 at 4:03 AM, Mikel Maron <mikel at groundtruth.in> wrote:

> Stace
>
> I updated the coordination map of all Bangla projects with the boundary of
> Kendua
>
>
> http://umap.openstreetmap.fr/en/map/bangladesh-mapping-projects_26815#8/23.612/89.742
>
> -Mikel
>
> * Mikel Maron * +14152835207 @mikel s:mikelmaron
>
>
>   On Sunday, February 1, 2015 1:33 PM, Stacey Maples <
> stacemaples at stanford.edu> wrote:
>
>
>
> Thanks all. Here is the Umap for our pilot study area:
> http://umap.openstreetmap.fr/en/map/kendua_27641#11/24.6913/90.7841, as I
> understand from Eric, patients arrive at the subdistrict medical center
> from within the Kendua District, but I wonder if there might be some
> spillover from adjacent subdistricts (also, please correct my admin
> boundary terminology, if necessary), based upon travel times. TO account
> for that, it might make sense to work on a slightly larger envelope than
> Kendua.
>
> Yes, I agree on the building footprints being secondary. Our primary
> objective is to build a map that will provide a familiar enough reference
> for local health care workers and family members to identify the home
> village/community of the patients, without being present at the location,
> as care will be primarily given outside of the home community. Obviously,
> roads, paths and probably (I am only guessing as I have never been to
> Bangladesh) water courses would be most important for reference. I have
> seen some HOT jobs identifying "residential or populated" areas, which
> might also be useful, short of building footprints.  In our discussions,
> we identified schools, places of worship, markets, etc... as other
> landmarks that might help users orient. So if we move to creating building
> footprints, those would be of primary importance. We are also interested in
> the locations of pharmacies, and clinics/hospitals and other healthcare
> points of service.
>
> Finally, and I know this one would require people on the ground with GPS,
> it would be incredibly useful to identify drinking water facilities/sources.
>
> Mikel suggested establishing an OSM Bangla Skype Group to coordinate. I've
> just logged into my Skype account for the first time in years, so it is
> active. I will make sure I have a Skype client installed on all of my
> machines by tomorrow.  My Skype= stacey.maples
>
> Again, this response is fantastic. Thanks so much.
>
> In F,L&T,
> Stace Maples
> Geospatial Manager
> Stanford Geospatial Center
> @mapninja
> staceymaples at G+
> Skype: stacey.maples
> Get GeoHelp: https://gis.stanford.edu/
> "I have a map of the United States... actual size.
> It says, "Scale: 1 mile = 1 mile."
> I spent last summer folding it."
> -Steven Wright-
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"Jorieke Vyncke" <jorieke.vyncke at gmail.com>
> *To: *"Pete Masters" <pedrito1414 at googlemail.com>
> *Cc: *"Stace Maples" <stacemaples at stanford.edu>, hot at openstreetmap.org,
> "Eric Jorge Nelson" <eric.j.nelson at stanford.edu>, "Fred Moine" <
> frmoine at gmail.com>, "Kunce Dale" <dale.kunce at redcross.org>
> *Sent: *Saturday, January 31, 2015 2:05:12 AM
> *Subject: *Re: [HOT] Request for help/guidance on a project to test
> diarrheal disease interventions in Kendua Sub-District, Bangladesh.
>
> Hi Stace and Eric,
>
> Pete is talking about the same people as I did to you before. Some of our
> Bangladesh mappers are now also on this list... But I will sent you a
> follow up mail on this.
>
> Further I like very much your idea, and would like to give you some input.
> Talking out of my experience; to trace patients, not necessarily all
> buildings are needed in the first phase. To track patients the main
> important this is to be able to locate people. So this means collecting
> locally used neighbourhood names, locally used street names,
> and landmarks used by the people. Buildings are in my view then a second
> step.
>
> I don't know how big the area is you're focused on? Maybe you can quickly
> point it on a Umap  <http://umap.openstreetmap.fr/>for us? Fingers
> crossed, for good imagery in the area of interest...
>
> Also I was thinking it might be good to set up an OSM Bangla Skype group
> to try to coordinate all the upcoming projects a little bit. Lastly there
> was also interest of Terre des Hommes, the American Red Cross is going to
> do more things in spring,... So we can coordinate a bit and share resources
> and thoughts on mapping in the very particular context of Bangladesh.
> Please let me know if you are interested in this.
>
> Best greetings,
>
> Jorieke
>
>
>
>
>
> 2015-01-31 9:55 GMT+01:00 Pete Masters <pedrito1414 at googlemail.com>:
>
> Hi Stace, I have just come back from Dhaka (literally on Thursday), where
> we were working with the local OSM community to map two areas,
> Kamrangirchar and Hazaribagh, for the Missing Maps project. We worked with
> between 10-30 volunteers of varying skills each day for two weeks. They are
> a smart and enthusiastic bunch and most said they planned to keep mapping
> anyway. They all have experience in using field papers and surveys and
> Osmand, and most have at least a days experience using JOSM to edit /
> upload.
> I have email addresses and phone numbers if you want them or you can
> contact them via the OpenStreetMap Bangladesh Facebook page.
> There are also a number of very experienced mappers / OSM focused GIS
> people I can put you in touch with directly.
> Let me know what you think...
> Cheers,
> Pete
> On 30 Jan 2015 21:38, "Stacey Maples" <stacemaples at stanford.edu> wrote:
>
> All,
>
> I'm working with a faculty member studying the efficacy of mobile app
> based interventions, who needs detailed street and building footprints for
> his pilot. He is working in the Kendua sub-district of Bangladesh,
> initially, and needs data for health workers to use to identify cholera
> patients homes/home village, pharmacies, etc... I've pasted his abstract,
> below. If he finds efficacy, he will likely expand the project to other
> sub-districts. We are wondering several things:
>
> First, what is the process to have a project added to the Task Manager?
>
> Second, do you happen to currently have mappers in this area who could
> work on this?
>
> Finally, we may be able to obtain gps traces from food delivery drivers to
> upload to OSM. It would be great to have a training for them if there are
> mappers in the area, or in Dhaka who would be willing to travel. Wondering
> who to contact about the possibility of that (I know bulk uploads are
> frowned upon unless coordinated with OSM).
>
> Thanks in advance for your time, I've pasted the abstract for the project,
> below my signature.
>
>
> In F,L&T,
> Stace Maples
> Geospatial Manager
> Stanford Geospatial Center
> @mapninja
> staceymaples at G+
> Get GeoHelp: https://gis.stanford.edu/  <https://gis.stanford.edu/>
> "I have a map of the United States... actual size.
> It says, "Scale: 1 mile = 1 mile."
> I spent last summer folding it."
> -Steven Wright-
>
>
> Leveraging mobile technology to improve clinical outcomes and scientific
> research of the second leading cause of childhood death: diarrheal disease
>
> Abstract
> Diarrheal disease is the second leading cause of death among children
> under 5 years of age globally. We are specifically interested in the
> diarrheal disease cholera because of the devastating impact the disease has
> on at-risk populations and the emerging opportunities to leverage mobile
> technology to overcome fundamental clinical, epidemiologic, and scientific
> challenges. Despite effective treatments and advances in provider
> education, cholera case fatality rates remain unacceptably high.
> Conventional methods have been unable to overcome barriers to provide
> patients timely access to care in resource-poor settings. This is
> especially true early in outbreaks because response teams are slow to
> mobilize and cholera can infect, transmit and kill in less than 20 hours.
> Our research challenge is to take an unconventional approach to develop a
> new method using mobile technology to identify outbreak clusters early,
> improve care, and advance our basic understanding of the disease. The
> specific aims of this project are to (i) develop mobile technology for
> clinical decision support and real-time epidemiology, (ii) test the
> mobile-technology and determine microbial correlates to disease progression
> at the hospital level, and (iii) test the mobile-technology and determine
> microbial correlates to disease progression at the community level. We
> chose to develop and test this strategy in partnership with the Ministry of
> Health of Bangladesh at a site with high cholera morbidity and relatively
> high mortality. We anticipate this NIH funded research will provide an
> exciting cross-departmental forum for collaboration and training, as well
> as a pathway to discovery that will directly benefit populations inflicted
> with diseases like cholera.
>
> Eric Jorge Nelson, MD PhD
> Pediatric Global Health Physician Scientist Instructor,
> Division of Infectious Diseases Department of Pediatrics,
> Stanford University School of Medicine
> Email: eric.nelson.mdphd at gmail.com
> Telephone: (857)-492-2174
> Address: Beckman B241, School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5323
>
>
>
> In F,L&T,
> Stace Maples
> Geospatial Manager
> Stanford Geospatial Center
> @mapninja
> staceymaples at G+
> Get GeoHelp: https://gis.stanford.edu/
> "I have a map of the United States... actual size.
> It says, "Scale: 1 mile = 1 mile."
> I spent last summer folding it."
> -Steven Wright-
>
>
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