<div dir="ltr">Hi<div><br></div><div>I know some of us have seen and chatted about this report, but not sure if it was shared here. Very interesting read.</div><div><br></div><div><a href="http://cartong.org/sites/cartong/files/GIS%20Support%20for%20the%20MSF%20Ebola%20Response%20in%20Guinea_Case%20Study.pdf">http://cartong.org/sites/cartong/files/GIS%20Support%20for%20the%20MSF%20Ebola%20Response%20in%20Guinea_Case%20Study.pdf</a><br>
</div><div><br></div><div>Just a few things I picked up on</div><div><br></div><div><div>"MSF should discuss such issues with HOT in order to establish </div><div>a set of procedures and manage expectations, for example, to define the </div>
<div>type and frequency of feedback, the extent of public communication, as </div><div>well as when the task has been completed (deactivation)."</div><div><br></div><div>Indeed. Attention is part of HOT's currency, and we should strike the right balance. Looking forward to following up on this!</div>
<div><br></div><div>Apparently the GIS officer collected information back to OSM, like village locations. Making this an easy workflow and set of tools is important.</div><div><br></div><div>Building level detail was not cited as particularly useful. However, buildings were essential for the population estimate maps (awesome work Andrew) which were cited as useful. There's also long term utility; some interviewee commented they were surprised maps didn't already exist from past years work in the region.</div>
<div><br></div><div>"Given the usefulness of these maps, MSF should identify current areas of operation where the organisation expects to continue to work and try to produce base maps for these areas"</div><div>
<br></div><div>That's outside the ebola response ... suggests preparation exercises with HOT, perhaps like awesome Jorike's DRC field mission, and the MissingMaps initiative.</div></div><div><br></div><div>-Mikel</div>
<div><br></div></div>