<div dir="ltr"><div><div><div>Blake has mostly covered it. But worth saying explicitly, if we assume that the best you're going to get on a GPS is 5m, but your concern is that you're mapping things that are much closer together - then the solution is to combine the GPS and paper based approach. The important thing from a navigation point of view is getting the relevant features correctly placed reactive to each other. <br><br></div>What you will find is that the combination of airial/gps and survey data will bring the accuracy down. But ultimately, relative postition is the key.<br><br></div>Cheers<br></div>Chris <br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Mon, 29 Feb 2016 at 17:43 Gertrude Hope <<a href="mailto:trudyhope7@gmail.com">trudyhope7@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><p>Hi Blake,<br>
Thank you so much for The information.</p>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Feb 29, 2016 7:31 PM, "Blake Girardot" <<a href="mailto:bgirardot@gmail.com" target="_blank">bgirardot@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br type="attribution"></div>
_______________________________________________<br>
HOT mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:HOT@openstreetmap.org" target="_blank">HOT@openstreetmap.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot</a><br>
</blockquote></div></div>