On Fri, Aug 9, 2013 at 10:19 AM, Alex Barth <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:alex@mapbox.com" target="_blank">alex@mapbox.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div class="im">On Thu, Aug 8, 2013 at 11:33 PM, Serge Wroclawski <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:emacsen@gmail.com" target="_blank">emacsen@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>



</div><div class="im"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="overflow:hidden">What that means is that we can create a metric of OSM activity in an<br>


area, and by doing that, decide whether or not the area should have an<br>
automated import process, or a manual review process.</div></blockquote></div></div><br>Correct me if I'm wrong (eric fischer) - isn't that what the automated script inherently does by only touching nodes that haven't been touched by contributors?</div>

</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Even in the best mapped areas, by luck, there are a few nodes that never got moved (even tiger typewriter monkeys can occasionally place a node correctly ).  Thus you'll see little splotches of new tiger 2010 data kinda all over.</div>

<div><br></div><div>The proposal on the table is that, perhaps, well mapped regions should be left alone.</div><div>In the remaining areas, the Tiger refresh could then be even more aggressive, perhaps even adding new nodes and metadata. </div>

</div>