<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">2015-04-14 12:22 GMT+02:00 Frederik Ramm <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:frederik@remote.org" target="_blank">frederik@remote.org</a>></span>:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div id=":259" class="" style="overflow:hidden">Examples:<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.openstreetmap.org/node/879707991" target="_blank">http://www.openstreetmap.org/node/879707991</a><br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.openstreetmap.org/node/879714919" target="_blank">http://www.openstreetmap.org/node/879714919</a><br>
</div></blockquote></div><br><br>I agree that exoatmospheric tests and underwater / over water tests are not surveyable and are indeed events of the past which hardly will have left traces that we can observe now, but there are lots of other examples which are impressive and are surveyable perfectly with common aerial imagery like bing or mapbox satellite, e.g. <br><br><a href="http://www.openstreetmap.org/node/879020722">http://www.openstreetmap.org/node/879020722</a> (look it up in JOSM).<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Cheers,<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Martin<br></div></div>