[osm-professional] isokron - isochronous maps of Paris

Serge Wroclawski emacsen at gmail.com
Fri Mar 26 12:34:30 GMT 2010


Arnaud,

On Wed, Mar 24, 2010 at 4:21 PM, Arnaud CAVAILHEZ <arnaud at cavailhez.fr> wrote:
> Hi everyone !

Welcome to the community!

>
> some of you may have heard of isokron on newbies already,

> I believe isokron is a neat idea and I would like to let it grow. To
> allow this to happen, by lending servers and hiring people namely, I
> would need to commercialize a product based upon OSM. Our ideas yet are
> prints of the maps, and consulting to some extent.

> My question for osm-professional is simple :
> Did such a situation happened to one of you in the past and how was it
> managed ? Is there a common procedure for it ?

Arnaud,

One of the benefits of OpenStreetMap to your business is that the
terms and conditions of usage are largely simple and transparent. The
data is available to you under the terms of the license, which is
currently the Creative Commons CC-BY-SA license described here:

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.fr

The specifics on how to apply this license are described on the Wiki in English:

http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Legal_FAQ

I should note that I am not a lawyer, and that you may wish to consult
an attorney.

But I did notice a few things about your web site that come up:

1) You mention "Open Street Maps", but the project is named
OpenStreetMap. OpenStreetMap is a name, rather than a description, so
it's always one word, camel case and singular. I know that in some
places (China?) the name has been translated, but I don't know about
France.

2) You should read the FAQ over about specifics on how/where to credit
OSM on your web site and on any printed maps.

3) The trickiest issue is that of data and how two datasets intersect.
It /appears/ from the visual that you've simply overlaid some other
dataset on top of OSM. That is okay, as it's a Collected Work.

If on the other hand, you've created a dataset from OSM data (for
example, by looking at the size of the road, the max speed of the
cars, the number of turns, etc.) then that would be a Derived Data set
and if you distribute this data (ie sell it) then you would need to
then provide the data to your customers under the same terms as the
original data.

This doesn't mean you can't sell it, and can't sell your maps, either.
It just means you have an additional requirement to make the data
available, just as you would if you were selling Free or Open Source
software.

As I said, I am not an attorney and so this is only my interpretation.

The OpenStreetMap Foundation also provides a mailing list for legal
issues and discussions.

So, to summarize:

1. Very cool web site. Awesome maps (helpful, colorful, etc.)

2. Please check out how to credit OSM. Those requirements are pretty
small/easy to do.

3. If the data you're using to generate the overlay (what's displayed
by color) is from a third party (or collected by you) then as far as
OSM is concerned, you're in the clear (except for the credit part as
mentioned above).

4. If the data is derived from OpenStreetMap, you may have a
requirement for redistribution of your data.


- Serge




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