[Tagging] Central European insight needed: cukrászda, cukrárna, cukiernia, ciastkarnia, cukráreň, pasticceria, konditorei, patisserie, ...

Paul Allen pla16021 at gmail.com
Wed Jul 1 21:22:05 UTC 2020


On Wed, 1 Jul 2020 at 21:54, Martin Koppenhoefer <dieterdreist at gmail.com>
wrote:

>
> > On 1. Jul 2020, at 02:29, Paul Allen <pla16021 at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Few people would want to stand
> > in a queue while raw food is cooked for them.
>
> You have been writing a lot about cooking raw food,


When talking of cafes, yes.  Especially the ones that do an all-day
breakfast
fry-up.  It depends on their size, time of day, etc, but smaller ones can't
risk pre-preparing a lot of food.


> but regular restaurants also use a lot of ingredients that have been
> precooked, typically by themselves , maybe not yet finished but to a point
> where they can be finished quicker.


Very true.  Common to bad Indian restaurants - pre-cooked meats, pre-cooked
sauces, keep them all hot and throw them together to give tandoori lamb or
tandoori chicken or lamb madras or...  Not much like the real cuisine.


> AFAIK also the British cuisine has lots of stews and similar food that has
> not to be cooked freshly to the minute and that needs significant cooking
> time.


Not many posh restaurants have stew on the menu, as I recall.

It’s not the waiting time that’s the main distinction between a fast food
> and a restaurant, it’s also the time you give yourself for eating and the
> ambience. For example a restaurant without tablecloth is not thinkable (at
> least in many countries) while a fast food hardly ever has it.
>

I mentioned ambience wrt restaurants many posts ago.  But there is also,
usually, a longer waiting time in restaurants than cafes.  And it's
entirely possible
that in some restaurants the waiting time is artificially stretched (some
computer
programs and on-line equivalents do the same thing because many people
wouldn't
trust them if they returned the result very quickly).

>
> Think about sushi, it is generally not considered fast food, but it can be
> prepared relative quickly because no cooking is involved.
>

So food that is not "fast food" can be fast.  Does that mean that some fast
food
can be slow?  And McDonalds are fast food restaurants.  And Little Chef
transport
cafes are roadside restaurants.

It's getting very blurry again.

-- 
Paul
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