[Tagging] Narrowing the application range of the smoothness tags

Richard Smits rhhsmits at yahoo.com
Wed Jan 27 09:29:02 UTC 2021


 My mail from last week has been in the moderation queue for being too long, so I've cut it up in 2 parts:


Thank you all for your reactions!

@Andy indeed it’s much text, but I thought it was needed. Ire-arranged much of it in the table you can now find at https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Talk:Key:smoothness#Making_smoothness_more_verifiableHope it’s clearer what I intend to do.

@Peter I’m not sure I understand what you want to say. Whatdo you propose to change? I had in mind to focus on describing smoothness for4-wheeled vehicles; this smoothness can then still be applied to narrow wayssuitable only for 2-wheelers (if this way was wide enough for a 4-wheeler,which class would be able to pass it?).

@Stefan I hope you agree that putting the more detailedexplanations in an additional table column makes it clearer? If necessary, evenmore details could be put in a separate page, like this one https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Berlin/Verkehrswende/smoothnessI don’t see why we should have an even higher tier of smoothness (“perfect”, maybe?) above that of “excellent”(near-perfect) because even for rollers that wouldn’t make much difference inpractice.
@Graemeyou’re describing the present example photo of “impassable” that has been therefor a long time: I agree with Andy that the present example photos are moreconfusing than helpful. The one for “good” looks less smooth than the one for“intermediate”, and the “very_bad” one wouldn’t be a problem for a normal car(no need for high clearance). “Smoothness”will always be somewhat subjective, like many other tags used on OSM. However,I think it’s also extremely useful (see here Finding the 'invisible' millions who are not on maps“Google and Apple maps do not differentiate between a good road and a bad road- but that's so important,”). My aim with the proposed changes is to make itless subjective, but 100% objectivity is indeed an illusion.

| 
| 
| 
|  |  |

 |

 |
| 
|  | 
Finding the 'invisible' millions who are not on maps

How open map data is filling in the world's missing maps and helping trace the spread of disease.
 |

 |

 |



1/2
  
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.openstreetmap.org/pipermail/tagging/attachments/20210127/3e20d836/attachment.htm>


More information about the Tagging mailing list