<div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Dec 17, 2009 at 7:07 PM, Liz <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:edodd@billiau.net">edodd@billiau.net</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="im">On Thu, 17 Dec 2009, Paul Johnson wrote:<br>
> Cyclists aren't allowed on most forest service trails, and those are<br>
> posted horse=no, bicycle=no, foot=yes.  Really, what's wrong with the<br>
> "bicycle=destination" idea I suggested for navigation purposes, without<br>
> trying to supersede common sense (ie, identifying and obeying traffic<br>
> control devices as they're encountered)?<br>
<br>
</div>Because I find bicycle=destination meaningless<br>
I might comprehend bicycle=journey in a literature exam or reading poetry<br>
but bicycle=destination I can't get my head around<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br></div></div></blockquote><div><br>Agreed, it's a bad name for a tag. I can't really see a difference between "bicycle=no" and "bicycle=dismount" to be honest, although it seems to me a naive router would distinguish them. <br>
<br>The more I think about the whole bicycle/footpath thing, at least in the Australian context, the more I conclude:<br>1) There are very *paths where bikes are really forbidden, and extremely few *paths where walking is forbidden.<br>
2) What cyclists who use maps really want to know is "how good is this path for riding" and "can I follow this *path somewhere useful?" - is it signed for example<br>3) What pedestrians who use maps really want to know is "are there any major physical obstructions between me and my destination" and "can I follow this *path somewhere useful?"<br>
4) Structuring everything in terms of legalities, which few people are actually aware of, doesn't make much sense in the Australian context.<br><br><br></div></div>In terms of 2), there are maybe four categories:<br>1) High quality bike paths: wide, smooth asphalt, gentle corners, no kerbs.<br>
2) Lower quality paths: concrete, or narrow, or with bumps and kerbs and stuff<br>3) Unsealed paths.<br>4) Paths that bikes are banned from.<br><br>And of course there are signed routes, which can include on-road sections. They're nice to know about.<br>
<br>That's all you care about. Maybe it's nice to tag every detail like the precise width of the road. But if you just had the information I described, you'd be a happy cyclist. The reason cyclists are not happy atm is that generally category 1 is tagged "cycleway" and categories 2-4 are tagged "footway" - or at least render that way. Whereas if you had to split them between two categories, you'd group 1-3 as cycleway, and 4 as footway.<br>
<br>That's my analysis for the night.<br><br>Steve<br>