On Sun, Jan 31, 2010 at 12:24 PM, Anthony <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:osm@inbox.org">osm@inbox.org</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="im">On Sun, Jan 31, 2010 at 12:22 PM, John Smith <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:deltafoxtrot256@gmail.com" target="_blank">deltafoxtrot256@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote">
<div class="im"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div>On 1 February 2010 03:16, Anthony <<a href="mailto:osm@inbox.org" target="_blank">osm@inbox.org</a>> wrote:<br>
> If you're not going to give a real world example (complete with a latitude<br>
> and longitude), don't bother.<br>
<br>
</div>I've told you where to look</blockquote></div><div><br>I googled <<2009 SoTM videos on 3D mapping>> and didn't find anything of note.<br></div></div>
</blockquote></div><br>Just watched <a href="http://www.vimeo.com/5673183">http://www.vimeo.com/5673183</a><br><br>Yeah, ultimately we're going to need to use areas with elevation information and/or full blown polyhedra.  Yes, 2D mapping isn't sufficient.  But 2D is closer to 3D than 1D.  :)<br>