2011/1/21  <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:john@jfeldredge.com">john@jfeldredge.com</a>></span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">I was a little surprised by this, until I looked up the definition of capital given in Wikipedia (primary city, as opposed to seat of government).  In American usage, the capital of a nation or sub-national region is its seat of government, whether or not that is the primary city in terms of population.  For example, Nashville is termed the capital of Tennessee, because it is the seat of the state government, even though Memphis, Tennessee is larger, and has been larger for most of Tennessee's history.<br>

</blockquote><div><br></div><div>This is what happens usually: a city (usually, but not necessarily, the largest city) is named the capital and is the seat of the government, and this is true for all the admin levels up to a certain one (for example, for Torino this upper limit would be 4, because it's the capital city for Regione Piemonte). But there are some exceptions, for example the case of Amsterdam, which is a) the capital of the country but not the capital of the province, and b) the capital of the country but not the seat of the national government. Some capitals may fall under case a), others under case b), Amsterdam is an example of both. <br>
</div><div><br></div><div>Ciao,</div><div><br></div><div>Simone</div>