<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jul 10, 2013 at 7:00 AM, Pieren <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:pieren3@gmail.com" target="_blank">pieren3@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div class="im">On Wed, Jul 10, 2013 at 3:07 PM, alyssa wright <<a href="mailto:alyssapwright@gmail.com">alyssapwright@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
</div><div class="im">> It is my understanding that kindergarten means something very different in other places of the world. How does OSM account for such cultural differences?</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Of the solutions, I feel that calling it what it's called locally is preferable.  Anyone who cares to compare across countries is going to have to parse the location first <i>anyway</i>.</div>

<div><br></div><div><br></div><div>In the USA the grades are well defined:</div><div><ul><li>Day care or Nanny Care (from birth)(generally private)</li><li>Preschool (age acceptance varies based on provider)(generally private)</li>

<li>Bridge-K (entry based on readiness)(generally private)</li><li>Kindergarten (entry based on age)(first universal public option)</li><li>Elementary (1st through 5th grade)(public option)</li><li>Middle (6th through 8th grade)(public option)</li>

<li>High School (9th through 12th grade also called freshman/sophmore /junior/senior)(public option)</li><li>Community College or College or Vocational School (rare except for a few feilds)</li><li>Masters Program</li><li>

Graduate Program</li></ul></div></div>