<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"><html><head><meta content="text/html;charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="Content-Type"></head><body ><div style='font-size:10pt;font-family:Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'>In some places (for example Poland) there are available orthophotos covering entire country, usable by OSM mappers. In USA there are probably maps made by federal government and therefore available as public domain works.In most places local governments have very detailed maps that may be usable (now or in the future). My city has map (unfortunately currently on unsuitable licence) with all roads, sidewalks etc mapped as areas.<br><br>And probably at least some mappers have access to "expensive surveying equipment". And something that for now borders on SF - drones are getting less and less expensive, it seems that really cheap aerial maps may appear in near future.<br><br>---- On Fri, 29 Nov 2013 16:32:26 -0800 <b>Dave Swarthout <<a subj="" mailid="daveswarthout%40gmail.com" href="mailto:daveswarthout@gmail.com" target="_blank">daveswarthout@gmail.com</a>></b> wrote ---- <br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid #0000FF; padding-left: 6px; margin:0 0 0 5px"><div><div style="font-size:10pt;font-family:verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Moreover, short of using expensive surveying equipment, how accurately can a volunteer mapper hope to place these areas on a street map with only his GPS and imperfect satellite imagery available as a guide?<br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid #0000ff; padding-left: 6px; margin:0 0 0 5px"><div dir="ltr"> </div></blockquote></div></div></blockquote><br></div></body></html>