<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"><html><head><meta content="text/html;charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="Content-Type"></head><body ><div style='font-size:10pt;font-family:Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;'>With mountain ranges there would be a major problem where node should be placed. Carpathian Mountains cover 190 000 kmĀ² - good luck with edit wars where node should be placed.<br><br>It probably would work better as a separate database.<br><div id="1"><br>---- On Thu, 12 Dec 2013 03:09:47 -0800 <b>Andrew Guertin <andrew.guertin@uvm.edu></b> wrote ---- <br></div><br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid #0000FF; padding-left: 6px; margin:0 0 0 5px">On 12/12/2013 05:53 AM, Martin Koppenhoefer wrote: <br>> 2013/12/12 Steve Bennett <<a href="mailto:stevagewp@gmail.com" target="_blank">stevagewp@gmail.com</a>> <br>>>> IMHO it would be nice to have an alternative dataset in lower zoomlevels <br>>>> for geographic regions and extended/blurry features, something like a set <br>>>> of shapefiles with translations into all languages we can provide, <br>>>> something similar to what natural earth data provides, but distributed and <br>>>> modified/translated by us, not just English and for higher zoom levels <br>>>> (i.e. more detailed) than what NE has. Still we could start with their <br>>>> geographic regions dataset and refine it, as "All versions of *Natural <br>>>> Earth* raster + vector map data found on this website are in the public <br>>>> domain." <br>>>> <br>>> Are you saying that this kind of data is a poor fit for OSM itself? <br>> <br>> yes, for the reasons described above: no clear boundaries / fuzzy borders. <br>> A solution could also be a new datatype in OSM for fuzzy objects, (e.g. a <br>> collection of objects and the consumer would create a hull area around <br>> them, possibly also roles for objects that are to exclude), but at least <br>> currently this kind of stuff does not fit into how osm works. <br> <br>Many villages or other small human settlements have no clearly defined  <br>boundaries, and we just represent them as a node. Similarly, many  <br>objects (say, shops) DO have clearly defined boundaries, but only have a  <br>node in OSM. In both cases, it's understood that the thing is an area,  <br>and the node means "it's somewhere around here". <br> <br>Those are common examples of nodes representing fuzzy objects, and I see  <br>no reason that a way couldn't also be fuzzy. Just as with nodes, it  <br>would be up to the consumer to either understand the level of fuzziness,  <br>ignore the feature entirely, or pass it through and let a human  <br>interpret it. <br> <br>--Andrew <br> <br>_______________________________________________ <br>Tagging mailing list <br><a href="mailto:Tagging@openstreetmap.org" target="_blank">Tagging@openstreetmap.org</a> <br><a href="https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/tagging" target="_blank">https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/tagging</a> <br></blockquote><br></div></body></html>