<div dir="ltr">I was using the surface tag with water as an example of something you would not do. Surface is a tag for highways that tells if the highway surface is paved, unpaved, concrete, asphalt, whatever. You would never use the tags natural=water and surface=concrete together to tag a single object. They simply do not belong together. That's all I was meaning to say.<div>

<br></div><div>I have no problem with either answer actually; drinking_water=yes is fine, as is drinkable=yes. Someone else suggested potable=yes — that's fine too. Potable is an accepted English term which means drinkable. It's just a question of which you prefer and which works best with what is already in use in OSM.</div>

</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Mar 6, 2014 at 3:18 PM, Vincent Pottier <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:vpottier@gmail.com" target="_blank">vpottier@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
  
    
  
  <div text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    <div>Le 28/02/2014 01:23, Dave Swarthout a
      écrit :<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">@<span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:17.27272605895996px">FrViPofm: </span>I
        respectfully disagree. The drinking_water tag you refer to is
        intended to indicate if drinking water is available at a certain
        facility, not whether it is safe to drink. The values in your
        example demonstrate this intention with "yes" and "no"
        comprising over 90% of the values in existence.
        <div>
          <br>
        </div>
        <div>As for the example of toilets with drinkable=yes, I agree
          that this might be confusing. In the Wiki it would be helpful
          to recommend that the drinkable tag be used with amenities
          like fountain, spring, etc. Using it as you did above is
          ambiguous. For example, one would not use the term
          surface=concrete to describe a waterway. Although nothing
          forbids you to use it that way, except common sense, it is
          intended to be used to describe the surface of a highway. I
          would hope drinkability would follow that sort of usage</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>Dave.<br>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    I'm sorry but I have not understood the comparison with the surface
    tag. Maybe I'm not enough skilful in English. Maybe I'm not clever
    enough.<br>
    I don't understand actually the meaning of waterway=* + surface=*.<br>
    But I have no problem with :<br>
    * amenity=fountain + drinking_water=catched_spring (maybe a better
    translation is possible)<br>
    * amenity=fountain + drinking_water=not_surveyed (found two those
    days)<br>
    * amenity=shelter + drinking_water=rainwater_tank<br>
    * amenity=toilets + drinking_water=yes<br>
    <br>
    "drinkable" and "drinking_water" are in the same semantic field, and
    are so near that I think it is painful, for mappers, for data
    consumers, to follow two tags.<br>
    <br>
    So why maintaining two tags for saying the same thing : "here we can
    find more or less drinkable/potable water in such condition", one
    tag for "standalone" features, one for amenities ?<br>
    --<br>
    FrViPofm<br>
  </div>

<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Tagging mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Tagging@openstreetmap.org">Tagging@openstreetmap.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/tagging" target="_blank">https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/tagging</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr">Dave Swarthout<br>Homer, Alaska<br>Chiang Mai, Thailand<br>Travel Blog at <a href="http://dswarthout.blogspot.com" target="_blank">http://dswarthout.blogspot.com</a></div>


</div>