<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Mar 22, 2014 at 4:59 AM, Philip Barnes <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:phil@trigpoint.me.uk" target="_blank">phil@trigpoint.me.uk</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="">On Sat, 2014-03-22 at 18:31 +0900, John Willis wrote:<br>
> Here in Japan, because of the imports - mostly German or vintage -<br>
> most toll plazas have a "left hand drive" spot ticket taking and toll<br>
> collection.<br>
><br>
</div>In France, at the start of Péages near the channel ports where there are<br>
a high number of UK cars. The A16 (South of Boulogne) and A26 (West of<br>
Calais) have right hand ticket pickup machines, unfortunately there are<br>
no right hand machines to pay at the other end of the péage section.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>This reminds me of something we have going on here in Oklahoma.  Not sure if it's just conveniently bad planning on the part of the chain or an intentional attempt to cater to the relatively large number (for North America, at least) right hand drive vehicles we have here.  The chain of fast food places called Burger Street have two drive-thrus, one on either side of the building.  If you're right-hand steer or don't mind the extra long reach (or have a codriver with you), the left line is typically faster.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Coincidentally, since gas stations are de-facto one-way (from street towards back) in many places, and du jure at most travel centers, truck stops, concessions plazas and most minimum or full service fuel lines, I truly hate having to get gas in a car with the fuel filler on the left, since lines for left hand pumps tend to be 3 or 4 times longer than for a right hand pump. </div>
</div></div></div>