<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">2015-03-03 10:31 GMT+01:00 Bryce Nesbitt <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:bryce2@obviously.com" target="_blank">bryce2@obviously.com</a>></span>:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"> The same can be said for public buildings like the White House, or the halls of congress.</blockquote></div><br><br><br clear="all">typically those places have different kind of toilets, some thought for visitors or a more general audience, others with more private character. Can also be observed in hospitals or hotels: there are toilets associated with the rooms (and practically private) and others open to all customers / visitors and maybe someone passing by and asking nicely. Many other private places (e.g. offices, shops) or those that might sometimes require a fee (e.g. museums, libraries) do have different kind of toilets, those for the staff and those for the visitors. In my school there used to be a distinction in toilets for the pupils (and visiting parents) and toilets for the teachers (accessible with keys). In Germany, many gas stations do have toilets for their customers, but you have to ask for a key (will normally get it also if you're not a customer). At (some) universities the toilets might legally not be intended for everyone but in practise you can just walk in for a toilet session.<br><br><br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Cheers,<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Martin<br></div></div>