<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN">
<html><body style='font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana,Geneva,sans-serif'>
<p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">On 2015-03-05 12:40, Martin Koppenhoefer wrote:</span></p>
<blockquote type="cite" style="padding-left:5px; border-left:#1010ff 2px solid; margin-left:5px">
<div dir="ltr">
<div class="gmail_extra"><br />
<div class="gmail_quote">2015-03-05 12:29 GMT+01:00 Janko Mihelić <span><<a href="mailto:janjko@gmail.com">janjko@gmail.com</a>></span>:<br />
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0 0 0 .8ex; border-left: 1px #ccc solid; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div>
<div> </div>
In case of more complicated steps, you can add a new tag, step_count:left=* and step_count:right=*, and put those ways on the dividing line, where you have a different number of steps on the left and on the right.</div>
</blockquote>
<div><br /><br /></div>
<div>-1, this doesn't seem to work. I also can't imagine a situation where this would occur actually, looks like a problem in the modelling (lower / upper way not modelled correctly). Steps not being there is all a question where you see the lateral boundary. Or maybe I am getting this wrong, can you point to a real world example?</div>
<div> </div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</blockquote>
<div dir="ltr">
<div class="gmail_extra">
<div class="gmail_quote">
<div>Where the steps (probably at the bottom) meet a street which is itself steeply sloping. The number of steps is not constant across the width and the difference between extreme left and extreme right may be several steps.</div>
<div> </div>
<div>How could we tag if the lowest/highest point of the steps area was actually one of the vertices, instead of an edge?</div>
<div> </div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</body></html>