<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">2015-03-18 11:09 GMT+01:00 Pieren <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:pieren3@gmail.com" target="_blank">pieren3@gmail.com</a>></span>:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div id=":1bc" class="a3s" style="overflow:hidden"> the use of abstruse<br>
abbreviations for the non-natives like "ngo", "aed" or "asl".<br></div></blockquote><div><br><br></div><div>+1<br><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div id=":1bc" class="a3s" style="overflow:hidden">
<span class=""><br>
> Even if certain things<br>
> were tagged differently in different parts of the word, that would not<br>
> break OpenStreetMap.<br>
<br>
</span>Only a fraction of us is thinking like this. Using 2, 3 or 10<br>
different tags for the exact same thing is surely providing a job for<br>
OSM consultants but is creating unnecessarily complexity for<br>
contributors and data consumers. </div></blockquote><div><br><br></div><div id=":1bc" class="a3s" style="overflow:hidden">this is only true if they want to have coverage of different parts of the world or map in different parts of the world, because it seems as if Fred asumed that inside these "parts" the tags would have been used consistently. Generally, having several tags meaning the same thing is not a problem, using the same tag with different meanings is a problem.<br><br></div></div>Cheers,<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Martin<br></div></div>