<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_signature">Now that the definition of designated campground has changed, its description the "Examples" section below should be changed as well.</div><div class="gmail_signature"><br></div><div class="gmail_signature">Here's what we have now:</div><div class="gmail_signature"><br></div><div class="gmail_signature"><div class="gmail_signature">#Designated campgrounds: sites that charge no or a nominal fee, have some or no facilities, sometimes limited length of stay, community feel, self managed. Typically less crowded than commercial campgrounds. For example locations in a community where you are allowed to put your motorhome or caravan. You don't pay but have no amenities or perhaps only drinking water and toilets. The service is provided by the community to attract visitors. France and Australia have many of such places;</div><div class="gmail_signature"><br></div><div class="gmail_signature">I don't think this is accurate. In my experience, designated sites are very similar to commercial sites except you pay a government for the privilege of camping there instead of a private party. The designated camp_sites I know of have almost as many services as the larger commercial ones, cost nearly the same and are certainly not self-managed. Nor or they less crowded. I'm thinking of the big campgrounds at American national and state parks. Yellowstone N.P. for example has several designated campgrounds that offer many amenities (recreation center, convenience stores, etc.) and cost $20/night for a standard site and $48/night for an RV site with "full hook-up", that is, water, electricity, and sewage disposal.  These campgrounds are crowded through the entire season and some, notably Denali N.P. in Alaska, available only with advance registration. </div><div class="gmail_signature"><br></div><div class="gmail_signature"><br></div><div class="gmail_signature">How about this:</div><div class="gmail_signature"><br></div><div class="gmail_signature">Designated campgrounds are similar to many commercial sites except may offer fewer services, the major difference being that most are managed not for profit but as a public service. Some are free but others may cost as much as a commercial site. They are often located within state, local, provincial, or national parks.</div><div class="gmail_signature"><br></div><div class="gmail_signature">By the way, under Examples in #6 you mention default rules where camping is allowed any place it's not prohibited. This is true for the entire state of Alaska. And of course there are many state administered and controlled, designated, camp_sites as well. It's worth noting that these sites are not free.</div><div class="gmail_signature"><br></div><div class="gmail_signature">Regards,</div><div class="gmail_signature"><br></div><div class="gmail_signature">Dave</div></div>
</div></div>