<div dir="ltr"><div>I agree completely with what John said in the previous reply.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Repeat: a fuel shop is not a car_parts shop. The "etc." was probably added there as a catch all to include tools specific to cars or whatever but it definitely, certainly does not include petrol. </div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Dave<br><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Mar 24, 2015 at 4:37 AM, John Willis <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:johnw@mac.com" target="_blank">johnw@mac.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><br>
<br>
Sent from my iPhone<br>
<span class=""><br>
> On Mar 24, 2015, at 2:48 AM, Friedrich Volkmann <<a href="mailto:bsd@volki.at">bsd@volki.at</a>> wrote:<br>
><br>
> On 23.03.2015 15:36, Martin Koppenhoefer wrote:<br>
>>> 2 liters of fuel are as much car_parts as a bakery is bicycle_parts.<br>
>><br>
>>    The definition says: "A place selling auto parts, auto accessories, motor<br>
>>    oil, car chemicals, etc."<br>
>><br>
>>    That fits perfectly.<br>
>><br>
>> can you expand? Someone sitting roadside selling just a few liters of<br>
>> petrol, how does he comply with this definition? Petrol is not in the list,<br>
>> it is neither auto parts nor auto accessories nor motor oil nor car<br>
>> chemicals. Are you after the "etc."?<br>
><br>
> Petrol is similar to motor oil, both are fluids made from mineral oil.<br>
> Diesel is identical with light fuel oil. So this is clearly the same group<br>
> of products, especially when sold in equally small quantities. What else is<br>
> the "etc." supposed to mean?<br>
><br>
<br>
<br>
</span>Just because they are both made from oil, and sold in similar quantities does not make the amenity or shop similar.<br>
<br>
This is about people's expectations.<br>
<br>
A toilet and a drinking fountain both involve fixtures that use water, yet tagged separately. Same with water point, tap, bidet, and other water based amenities - because people's *expectations* of what is present would be broken if I tagged a drinking fountain as a tap or toilet.<br>
<br>
That's the point of this is discussion.<br>
<br>
If I saw a car parts icon listed in Africa, and I need to get parts for vehicle ( even a single can of motor oil) - and I went to one of these shops, and there was an old lady selling gasoline for scooters in whiskey bottles out of a window in their house, I'd think the tagger had lost their mind and delete the shop. Similarly - if the tagger tagged this as a gas station, I'd think they are joking.<br>
<br>
I don't tag granny's roadside vegetable stand as a market nor distribution warehouse - but that is the same thing you are suggesting - but in some places it might be a permanent and expected way for some people to get vegetables - so how do I tag it? Do I pollute market when it is a table with 10 green onions and a few eggplants? They are a farmer, so is it food distribution?  Neither works, so a new solution should be found (for this example).<br>
<br>
<br>
Go look at my kerosene tagging example, and tell me what tag you would put on a gas station that doesn't actually sell gasoline or any fuel for cars. Should you like to further dilute petrol station tagging and include those too?<br>
<br>
If I see a gas pump icon, and thanks to the renders and data users, I would see a gas pump icon in both cases, it would make me very pissed to show up there with a car expecting 50L of gasoline.<br>
That's what we're trying to avoid.<br>
<br>
Javbw<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br></div></div></blockquote></div><div class="gmail_signature"></div>
</div></div>