<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Mar 28, 2015 at 1:16 PM, Jan van Bekkum <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:jan.vanbekkum@gmail.com" target="_blank">jan.vanbekkum@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div><br></div><div>It means that you create new tags for objects for which approved tags already exist, such as amenity=shower and leisure=swimming pool, this is not a good practice.</div></div></div></div></blockquote></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>1) There's no such thing as <i>approved</i>.</div><div>2) The tagging style is common practice</div><div>3) It lets you tag things that don't exist, such as the 2,939 uses of "swimming_pool=no", and the 9,232 uses of "drinking_water=no".  Tagging of the lack of water is crucial to backpackers and presumably overlanders.</div><div>4) It lets you readily map campsites based on a printed park service map, where the location and amenities are clear, but you've never visited.</div><div><br></div><div>There is not one style of mapping.  Trying to cram everything into one grand scheme does not work (example: trying to cram sewage disposal and recycling into the waste disposal tag).</div><div><br></div><div><br></div></div></div></div>