<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /></head><body style='font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana,Geneva,sans-serif'>
<p>We don't do it for street names... There is a High Street in every town and we seem to survive...</p>
<div> </div>
<p>You could use geolocation or your own geometry to find the place enclosing (or nearest to) the stop</p>
<p>You could use the is_in tag to provide this information (not sure about the status of this tag)</p>
<p>You could use "long_name" to provide a version of the name which includes the discriminators</p>
<p>//colin</p>
<p>On 2016-07-07 08:04, Tijmen Stam wrote:</p>
<blockquote type="cite" style="padding: 0 0.4em; border-left: #1010ff 2px solid; margin: 0"><!-- html ignored --><!-- head ignored --><!-- meta ignored -->
<div class="pre" style="margin: 0; padding: 0; font-family: monospace"><span style="white-space: nowrap;">On 07-07-16 01:28, John Willis wrote:</span>
<blockquote type="cite" style="padding: 0 0.4em; border-left: #1010ff 2px solid; margin: 0"><br /><br />
<blockquote type="cite" style="padding: 0 0.4em; border-left: #1010ff 2px solid; margin: 0"><span style="white-space: nowrap;">On Jul 7, 2016, at 6:39 AM, Tijmen Stam <<a href="mailto:mailinglists@iivq.net">mailinglists@iivq.net</a>> wrote:</span><br /><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">1. a "placename" (or "place") tag for stop_position, platform and stop_area. I notice that most public transport companies have a somewhat separate idea of a place name and a stop name.</span></blockquote>
<br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">This sounds like the destination names on road signs, especially on motorways.  (interstate 5 north - Los Angeles), the "control city" in US highway lingo.</span></blockquote>
<br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">No, that's not at all what I mean!</span><br /><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">It's the place the stop is _in_.</span><br /><br /> For example, a rural line going from Acity to Ecity via Btown, Cville and Dhamlet might have the stops on the website as<br /><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">Acity, City Hall</span><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">Acity, Industrial Park</span><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">Acity, Junction</span><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">Btown, Church</span><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">Cville, Church</span><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">Cville, Post Office</span><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">Cville, Industrial Park</span><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">Dhamlet, Junction</span><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">Ecity, Post Office</span><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">Ecity, City Hall</span><br /><br /> So if you are _in_ Btown, you'd only see "Church" on the bus stop <ground truth>. But on the site you'd see a stop at "Industrial Park" at both 8:04 and at 8:31, and without what I propose as "placename" you wouldn't be able to discern between the two.<br /><br /> The place a certain stop goes _to_ (as you thought my proposal means) can be deciphered by interpreting the various public_transport=route relations that have the stop_position/platform as their member.<br /><br /><br /> _______________________________________________<br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;">Tagging mailing list</span><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;"><a href="mailto:Tagging@openstreetmap.org">Tagging@openstreetmap.org</a></span><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;"><a href="https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/tagging">https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/tagging</a></span></div>
</blockquote>
</body></html>