<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jul 13, 2016 at 5:57 AM, Martin Koppenhoefer <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:dieterdreist@gmail.com" target="_blank">dieterdreist@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><span class=""><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">2016-07-13 8:39 GMT+02:00 Paul Johnson <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:baloo@ursamundi.org" target="_blank">baloo@ursamundi.org</a>></span>:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">I would advise against this; and instead use a separate relation for each direction of a route as it greatly simplifies maintenance of the route.</blockquote></div><br><br><br clear="all"></div></span><div class="gmail_extra">+1. Some people also add a third relation (route master) to group the two (plus eventual variants).<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Tends to be a requirement on low-budget big-city transit systems in the US, for which a route will branch and loop over a broader area at the expense of frequency of service and travel time.</div></div></div></div>