<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Jan 5, 2017 at 8:05 AM, Greg Troxel <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:gdt@lexort.com" target="_blank">gdt@lexort.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Arguably, if the coworking space intened to accomodate professional<br>
carpenters who worked for different companies, maybe that would be<br>
coworking.  But really coworking is about something that feels like an<br>
office with coworkers and support services, but is shared by poeple that<br>
work for different companies or are perhaps self-employed.   To me, a<br>
core part of coworking space is that most(?) of the people using it view<br>
it as the physical location of their main employment.<br></blockquote></div><br>+1<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">I've visited a couple of coworking spaces in my country and have looked at websites of several others. Coworking spaces are targeted towards white-collar office desk jobs, usually for freelancers who are into graphic design, software development, or other online-based outsourcing jobs. Students who need a place to study or do projects also go to coworking spaces. Clients of coworking spaces typically need a desk, Wi-Fi Internet access, and probably coffee or tea for refreshment. You can typically rent a desk or a small office space by the month, or just rent a desk for the day, hot-desking-style.<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">I can find arguments favoring either amenity=* or office=* so I don't really care which of the two is used. But I think *=coworking is better than *=coworking_space since coworking is really tied to the definition of renting some office desk space in order to study or work. Plus it's shorter to type.<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div></div>