<div dir="ltr"><div><br></div>Here's a clarification from an American:<div><br></div><div>In U.S. English, timber is a term meaning "standing trees". It does not indicate or specify any particular end use although such trees as you would find in a "stand of timber" are probably destined for lumber. Timber, once cut and sawn into boards or beams, is then called lumber. Some grades of timber might be converted to chips or pulp for paper but most probably lumber will be the end product.</div><div><br></div><div>I have often heard the term "pulpwood" to describe the fast-growing trees that are grown for paper making. Such stands of pulpwood would, IMO, generally also be tagged with landuse=forest as well as produce=pulp (or wood_pulp). For that matter, stands of timber are often planted that same way, in rows spaced to maximize the output.</div><div><br></div><div>produce=timber works fine for me</div><div><br></div><div>Best,</div><div>Dave</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Jan 14, 2017 at 7:56 PM, Martin Koppenhoefer <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:dieterdreist@gmail.com" target="_blank">dieterdreist@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div><br><br>sent from a phone</div><div><br>On 13 Jan 2017, at 22:44, Warin <<a href="mailto:61sundowner@gmail.com" target="_blank">61sundowner@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div>tag: produce=timber description: Trees harvested for <b><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timber" class="m_6481740072340343568extiw" title="wikipedia:Timber" target="_blank">timber</a></b>, called 'lumber' in north America. Further processing results in sawn wood, wood chips, paper.</div></blockquote><br><div><br></div><div>wood chips and paper are excluded by timber though, not? I'm not sure an exclusive produce=timber makes a lot of sense, typically all parts of a tree are used. The best wood is used for furniture, veneers, then construction wood, and finally what remains becomes wood chips, paper, chipboard or pellets...</div><div><br></div><div>cheers,</div><div>MartinĀ </div></div><br>______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
Tagging mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Tagging@openstreetmap.org">Tagging@openstreetmap.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/tagging" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.openstreetmap.<wbr>org/listinfo/tagging</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr">Dave Swarthout<br>Homer, Alaska<br>Chiang Mai, Thailand<br>Travel Blog at <a href="http://dswarthout.blogspot.com" target="_blank">http://dswarthout.blogspot.com</a></div></div>
</div>