<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class="">Martin,<div class=""><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">Op 16 jan. 2017, om 11:38 heeft Martin Koppenhoefer <<a href="mailto:dieterdreist@gmail.com" class="">dieterdreist@gmail.com</a>> het volgende geschreven:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">Maybe it could be interesting to see _where_ the usage does not conform to the definition, i.e. from the actual definition, this tag wouldn't have a place outside of the UK (maybe commonwealth) anyway. What about Britain, is the usage there inconsistent as well?</span></div></blockquote></div><br class=""></div><div class="">My four examples of “wrong” use, are all from within Britain.</div><div class="">And it seems that outside of Britain the use differs wildly from the definition becuase to many people village_green simply means “green spots inside a vilage”, and that’s what they use it for.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Marc.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div></body></html>