<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div class="">TL;DR: we need a tag for shops that have pumps that sell only fuels that are not transportation related (car/boat/plane). </div><div class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">                </span>Like this stand:  <a href="https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/468201418#map=19/36.30322/139.30387" class="">https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/468201418#map=19/36.30322/139.30387</a> . </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">- There are many fuel stands that sell heating oil - * just heating oil (kerosene)*. They look like a gasoline stand.</div><div class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">               </span> <a href="http://cdn.gogo.gs/images/rally/1299000029-1448779147.jpg" class="">http://cdn.gogo.gs/images/rally/1299000029-1448779147.jpg</a>  (only kerosene <span style="color: rgb(84, 84, 84); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: small; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class="">灯油)</span></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">- I have never seen such a stand in California. This is a regional thing, but a very common mappable object (more than 2000 in Japan?) </div><div class="">         </div><div class=""><font color="#545454" face="arial, sans-serif" size="2" class=""><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class="">- Some are small stands with covered pumps, as they are only open in the winter. They are at DIY stores that do not sell gasoline for cars. </span></font></div><div class=""><font color="#545454" face="arial, sans-serif" size="2" class=""><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class="">   <a href="http://d3rr6qn2571boz.cloudfront.net/images/rally/0999000177-1428840382.jpg" class="">http://d3rr6qn2571boz.cloudfront.net/images/rally/0999000177-1428840382.jpg</a> People can buy the kerosene without going in the parent shop. </span></font></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">- these should not be mapped as a amenity=fuel to avoid confusion with a standard “Gasoline stand” for cars (or boats). </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">- They need their own tag, like the one created. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">- kerosene/paraffin needs to be added to fuel.  </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""> - Kerosene/paraffin is also a commonly sold fuel at larger gas stations in Japan, so it should **also** be a fuel type that is sold at a standard amenity=fuel gasoline stand.  <a href="http://cdn.gogo.gs/images/rally/1008000049-1468612524.jpg" class="">http://cdn.gogo.gs/images/rally/1008000049-1468612524.jpg</a> They do not share the same pump islands for safety reasons.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""> - For shops that sell pre-measured fuel (lets say 1/3/5L oil-mixed gasoline for gardening tools), I don’t know of a solution. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">~~~~~~~~~~~~~</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">I’m jumping in because I was trying to tag a kerosene stand (UK: paraffin (?) / <span style="color: rgb(84, 84, 84); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: small; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class="">灯油 in Japanse) again, and remembered seeing this thread. </span> </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">The gasoline stand <a href="https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/246280123" class="">https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/246280123</a> </div><div class="">The kerosene stand <a href="https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/468201418#map=19/36.30322/139.30387" class="">https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/468201418#map=19/36.30322/139.30387</a></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">The problem I am running into is that the fuel shops that I am trying to tag **look** like a gas station - but **do not sell gasoline or diesel**. it is not a “gas station” it is a Heating oil stand.  it sells kerosene. it is outdoors. it has pumps. some people pull their cars up to it.  But they They fill tanks of kerosene. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Most people in Japan have kerosene heaters, and they use 18/20L red plastic tanks (metal is for gasoline) to store kerosene at their house for filling the indoor kerosene heaters. This is how consumers buy fuel to take home. the DIY shop sells the tanks and the heaters, (<a href="http://blog-imgs-44.fc2.com/o/s/h/oshiken2/6011701.jpg" class="">http://blog-imgs-44.fc2.com/o/s/h/oshiken2/6011701.jpg</a> ) and the pumps outside sell you the kerosene.  I bring 5-6 tanks to the stand every couple months. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">There is a MASSIVE infrastructure for kerosene distribution in Japan. most DIY or home stores have a “kerosene stand” for selling only kerosene for heating. they have pump(s) like you would have for gasoline used to fill those tanks, but are in a small building to close off the pump in the summer. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">we use 400-600L a winter, so the kerosene stand is always busy with people carrying 2-4 tanks. Some people bring 10-20.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">These stands also are a part of larger Gasoline stands. Just like a Gasoline stand that sells Propane, LNG, and/or hydrogen, there is a special pump stand off to the side (far away from the gasoline pumps, as gasoline in a kerosene heater is a bomb), usually with a metal stand for you to set your tanks. This is a common sight at larger gas stations. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><a href="https://goo.gl/maps/NpXPFC8VmSx" class="">https://goo.gl/maps/NpXPFC8VmSx</a> </div><div class="">This is the gasoline stand where I get Gasoline every week. It also has a kerosene pump off to the left. Main gas pumps on the right. note the little red stand for you to set your red tanks, and the red tanks for sale, bundled up on the left. a metro gas station in a warmer city may not sell kerosene. The photo for “amenity=fuel” wiki page is a gas station in Hiroshima. <a href="http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/w/images/d/d7/Gas_Station_Hiroshima.jpg" class="">http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/w/images/d/d7/Gas_Station_Hiroshima.jpg</a>. they don’t have a kerosene pump, so it is not something that is at every gas station in Japan has (like 87 octane regular gas), but it very common in my region. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Joyful Honda is a DIY superstore, and they have gasoline stands (Joyful Speed Station) that sell 87/92 gasoline and Diesel. Then there are separate, unrelated  kerosene stands (<span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class=""><font color="#545454" face="arial, sans-serif" size="2" class="">灯油).  The Joyful near me - the one I am trying to map - has both, with the gasoline stand 200m away from the kerosene stand on the other side of the paking lot. </font></span></div><div class=""><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class=""><font color="#545454" face="arial, sans-serif" size="2" class=""><br class=""></font></span></div><div class=""><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class=""><font color="#545454" face="arial, sans-serif" size="2" class="">you can see images of a typical gas station and a typical kerosene stand on their gasoline web site. you do not need to read Japanese to understand, beyond seeing the giant </font></span><span style="color: rgb(84, 84, 84); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: small; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class="">灯油 symbol. </span></div><div class=""><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class=""><font color="#545454" face="arial, sans-serif" size="2" class=""><br class=""></font></span></div><div class=""><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class=""><font color="#545454" face="arial, sans-serif" size="2" class=""><a href="https://www.joyfulhonda.com/jss/" class="">https://www.joyfulhonda.com/jss/</a> </font></span></div><div class=""><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class=""><font color="#545454" face="arial, sans-serif" size="2" class=""><br class=""></font></span></div><div class=""><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class=""><font color="#545454" face="arial, sans-serif" size="2" class=""><br class=""></font></span></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:00 PM, Martin Koppenhoefer <<a href="mailto:dieterdreist@gmail.com" class="">dieterdreist@gmail.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 13px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">because shop=fuel was proposed as tag for alternative places compared to actual petrol stations (amenity=fuel) for cases where someone would sell you fuel in parallel to the official distribution chain. In this situation, it seems more appropriate to use a property rather than a main tag (because these might be businesses with different "main tags" and fuel as an additional feature). Also they likely will not have a pump (otherwise, it would be clearly amenity=fuel).</span></div></blockquote></div><br class=""></body></html>