<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Feb 12, 2017 at 11:52 PM, Marc Gemis <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:marc.gemis@gmail.com" target="_blank">marc.gemis@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><span class="">On Sun, Feb 12, 2017 at 9:56 PM, Mark Wagner <<a href="mailto:mark%2Bosm@carnildo.com">mark+osm@carnildo.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> I'd consider mapping it as a dual carriageway.  I don't know what the<br>
> law is in Pennsylvania, but here in Idaho, a doubled double-yellow<br>
> line is the legal equivalent of a physical barrier: you are not allowed<br>
> to drive across it for any reason.<br>
<br>
</span>I would keep dual carriage way mapping for the cases with real<br>
physical barriers (such as guard rails or kerbs) or different surfaces<br>
(grass).<br>
IMHO, you loose valuable information by not mentioning there is a<br>
third lane in the middle.<br>
Emergency vehicles might want to know this, planning of very wide load<br>
transports might want to know this. Governments might need this<br>
information, so they know they can divert traffic over the middle lane<br>
in case of road works.<br>
There might be other applications that find this information valuable.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>This tends to be my line of thinking as well. </div></div></div></div>