<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Mar 10, 2017 at 2:04 PM, Mike Thompson <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:miketho16@gmail.com" target="_blank">miketho16@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><span class="">On Fri, Mar 10, 2017 at 7:34 AM, Kevin Kenny <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:kevin.b.kenny+osm@gmail.com" target="_blank">kevin.b.kenny+osm@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;padding-left:1ex;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-width:1px;border-left-style:solid"><div dir="ltr">
  
    
  
  <div bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000"><span>
    </span><br>
    I can just now hear, nevertheless, a chorus asserting that the
    information is available by other means and therefore does not
    belong in OSM. An adit or a cave entrance (that isn't a sinkhole)
    pretty much has to go into a hillside, and a waterfall or a dam
    flows downhill, so with information about local topography, the
    direction can be determined. </div></div></blockquote></span><div>In many parts of the world there may not be elevation data with an open license of suitable resolution to make this determination for an adit. </div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Outside the band of 54° S to 60° N, you're certainly right about that. Within that band, the August 2015 NASA data set is in the public domain and has coverage at 30 m resolution horizontally. That's probably Not Quite Good Enough - I get spoilt by the 10 m coverage available for North America.<br></div></div><br></div></div>