<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Mar 27, 2017 at 11:47 AM, Martin Koppenhoefer <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:dieterdreist@gmail.com" target="_blank">dieterdreist@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><span class="gmail-"></span>As a side note, your example Fort Montgomery, NY, to me doesn't look like a hamlet, there's an elementary school, shops, a fire department, gas station, hotel, cafe, sports grounds, and a significant amount of houses, I would consider calling this a village.<br></div></blockquote><div> <br>Local convention in New York is to follow the legal definitions. Fort Montgomery is legally a hamlet.  New York has a few 'hamlets' that are actually small cities. (Levittown, population about 52,000, is the largest of these.) Villages, towns, and cities are incorporated places with their own local governments. Hamlets have no local government other than the township and county that they're in.<br></div></div></div></div>