<div dir="ltr">On Sat, May 26, 2018 at 9:17 AM, Warin <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:61sundowner@gmail.com" target="_blank">61sundowner@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
  
    
  
  <div text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><div><div class="h5">
    <div class="m_2014189046119515317moz-cite-prefix">On 26/05/18 17:18, Mateusz Konieczny
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <br>
    <br></div></div>
    So ... why have seasonal?
  </div><br></blockquote><div>Because it may be useful for data consumers (and sometimes routers) to know,<br></div><div>for example, if water is present only during winter.   It helps in planning.  As in<br></div><div>being unable to use a track in winter because it crosses a riverbed which only<br></div><div>has water in it during winter.  Or planning a hike where you take account of<br></div><div>water sources to use in an emergency if there is a problem with your bottled<br></div><div>supply.<br><br></div><div>"Seasonal" isn't a guarantee of such things, of course, merely a guide to<br></div><div>probabilities, and it says that those probabilities are far higher at certain<br></div><div>times of year than at others.  "Intermittent" is also a guide to probabilities<br></div><div>but does not give a guide as to which times of year (or which years) are more<br>likely than others, because such things cannot be determined, it says water<br></div><div>might be there or might not.  "Ephemeral" says that the might be water there<br></div><div>but it's unlikely and if it is there is probably won';t be there for long.<br><br>-- <br></div><div>Paul<br><br></div></div></div></div>