<div dir="ltr">On Mon, Jun 11, 2018 at 11:41 PM, Martin Koppenhoefer <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:dieterdreist@gmail.com" target="_blank">dieterdreist@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><br>
> On 9. Jun 2018, at 15:53, Paul Allen <<a href="mailto:pla16021@gmail.com">pla16021@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> <br>
> Landuse=forest could mean a group of trees which are not<br>
> consistently used by a single organization for anything (and often called "Xyz Forest"<br>
<br>
<br>
interesting, can you give a real world example where a group of trees has actually the name “... forest”? I always thought a forest would require more trees.<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br></div></div></blockquote><div>Either one of us is completely misunderstanding what the other wrote or you're quibbling about the size of a group.<br><br></div><div>Sherwood Forest is 450 acres of trees.  It is a nature reserve and so it is not used for forestry (aka logging).  There may<br></div><div>be occasional felling of diseased trees but it is not systematically logged on a wide scale.<br></div><div><br></div><div>This is why landuse=forest is problematical.  Sherwood Forest is not land used for forestry, but it is called Sherwood<br>Forest so landuse=forest may seem like the correct tag to use (because it says "forest").<br><br></div><div>That's why abandoning landuse=forest in favour of landcover=trees or landuse=forestry (as appropriate) is a good<br></div><div>idea.  I'll also add that I don't think landcover=trees should be used in combination with landuse=forestry because what<br></div><div>is currently on land used for forestry may not be trees but saplings or stumps.<br><br>-- <br></div><div>Paul<br><br></div></div></div></div>