<html><head><meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body dir="auto"><br><br><div id="AppleMailSignature">sent from a phone</div><div><br>On 16. Aug 2018, at 22:52, Jmapb <<a href="mailto:jmapb@gmx.com">jmapb@gmx.com</a>> wrote:<br><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div>
  
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
  
  
    <p>On the other hand, an overlay with data about various risk
      factors -- crime, weather, accidents, air quality, cancer
      clusters, whatever -- would be a fine feature for a 3rd party map
      app to offer. But these things don't belong in the OSM database.</p></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div>actually crime statistics also tend to be biased. You don’t get the numbers of the crimes committed but of those reported to and registered at the police. <div>If the police investigates more crime of a certain type, the numbers in the statistics raise for example, if they frisk more people of a certain color of skin there seem to be more criminals of that color of skin.</div><div><br></div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div>
    <p>As far as "bad areas" and "class and racial bias" go, I'll admit
      that I contemplated the idea of tagging the walking paths within
      some city public housing projects as access=destination, because
      it reflects the reality on the ground -- </p></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div>access tags are about the legal access, not whether it makes sense to go there, or whether you might feel uncomfortable going there.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><blockquote type="cite"><div><p>generally, people don't
      walk *through* the projects to get to a destination on the other
      side. </p></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div>I’m usually doing this, as long as it isn’t explicitly forbidden. In particular public housing projects tend to allow walking through, while private residences tend to lock themselves in.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Cheers,</div><div>Martin </div></body></html>