<div dir="ltr"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Fri, Sep 21, 2018 at 6:05 PM Martin Koppenhoefer <<a href="mailto:dieterdreist@gmail.com">dieterdreist@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><br>
<br>
sent from a phone<br>
<br>
> On 19. Sep 2018, at 21:16, Tobias Zwick <<a href="mailto:osm@westnordost.de" target="_blank">osm@westnordost.de</a>> wrote:<br>
> <br>
> This is a good argument against tagging an explicit maxspeed=X when<br>
> there is actually no speed limit sign around (X is what the OSM mapper<br>
> by his knowledge about the law thinks should be the default limit here).<br>
<br>
<br>
everything that you map will be according to your understanding of it, I cannot see a good argument for not tagging implicit limits, even more as there is judgement needed based on the situation (something humans can do much better than computers). Every holder of a driving license should have the requisites to recognize the speed limit on a given piece of road in their local area, so it doesn’t require specialist knowledge.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Even then, those of us who <i>do</i> have specialist knowledge are more likely to contribute such information; why discourage that, further diseminating that knowledge in a more readily digestible format?</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
There actually is a speed limit on most roads, including those without explicit signage. Omitting it will leave us in the situation that it really becomes unclear whether there is no sign or nobody has bothered to enter it.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>In Oregon and a good number of Oklahoma counties, that would be a for-certain thing on all public roads. </div></div></div>