<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">Am Mi., 19. Dez. 2018 um 11:30¬†Uhr schrieb Volker Schmidt <<a href="mailto:voschix@gmail.com">voschix@gmail.com</a>>:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">"soft story" is actually an attribute of the whole building, not just one floor. It's a recognized classification of a structural characteristic of buildings.</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div>Yes and no.</div><div>According to Wikipedia [1], (and using British English spelling and hyphenation) a soft-storey building has one ore more soft storeys (=levels in OSM speak).<br></div><div>So if we know which level(s) are weak we need a way to map this. In case we only know that the building has a¬† "soft level" we need a different tagging.<br></div><br></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>weak according to what? Weaker than the rest of the structure? Weaker against which kind of forces? Weaker than the current building code would permit for a new construction? I can understand that an authority could define criteria and asses buildings according to it and give them a class like "soft storey", but this kind of generic class always implies some kind of subjective judgement. I cannot see how this tag could be verifiable apart from importing it from some authoritive source.</div><div><br></div><div>Cheers,<br></div><div>Martin<br></div></div></div>