<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /></head><body style='font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana,Geneva,sans-serif'>
<p>On 2018-12-20 13:27, Xavier wrote:</p>
<blockquote type="cite" style="padding: 0 0.4em; border-left: #1010ff 2px solid; margin: 0">
<div class="pre" style="margin: 0; padding: 0; font-family: monospace"><span style="white-space: nowrap;">On Thu, Dec 20, 2018 at 01:00:20PM +0100, Sergio Manzi wrote:</span>I *never *heard of a transformer's /tertiary/, thus: try asking an electrical engineer...<br /> In general, a transformer can have 1..N primary windings and 1..N secondary windings:<br /><br /><span style="white-space: nowrap;"><a href="https://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/transformer/multiple-winding-transformers.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">https://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/transformer/multiple-winding-transformers.html</a></span><br /><br /> The most common is the 1:1 (single primary, single secondary) transformer, followed next by a 1:N style (one primary, multiple secondary, this is usually used to provide plural output voltages from the same single transformer).<br /><br /> But in the general case (which is what OSM would, at some point, want to be able to cover), a transformer is N:N with each N being 1..X.<br /><br /></div>
</blockquote>
<div class="pre" style="margin: 0; padding: 0; font-family: monospace">And then there was the auto-transformer which only has a single winding with multiple taps.</div>
<div class="pre" style="margin: 0; padding: 0; font-family: monospace"> </div>
</body></html>