<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 at 07:45, Peter Elderson <<a href="mailto:pelderson@gmail.com">pelderson@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">Analogy is not right. Not tagging all trailheads with this wikipedia reference, just the specific limited set fitting this specific concept described on the wikipedia page. </div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Why would you do this?  People keep making analogies to point out to you that this is not a</div><div>sensible thing to do.  And you agree that it is not sensible to link every footpath to a wikipedia</div><div>page explaining what a footpath is.  You agree that is it not sensible to link every bridleway to</div><div>a wikipedia entry explaining what a bridleway is.  You agree that it is not sensible to link every</div><div>church to a wikipedia page explaining what a church is.  The rest of us think that, for the same</div><div>reasons, it is not sensible to link every TOP to a wikipedia explaining what a TOP is.</div><div><br></div><div>All you actually need is some form of tag for a TOP.  That way, if it's implemented properly, when</div><div>people use the query tool on the node (which they'd have to do anyway if you persuaded the rest</div><div>of us to agree with your idea of tagging TOPs with a wikipedia entry), they see a list of tags for</div><div>the node.  Clickable tags and values, which lead to the relevant OSM wiki page defining what the</div><div>value means.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Coming up with a tag for TOPs is the right way to do it.  Adding the <b>same</b> wikipedia tag to every</div><div> TOP, as you want to do, is the wrong way to do it.</div><div><br></div><div>-- <br></div><div>Paul</div><div><br></div><div><br></div></div></div>