<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Sun, 3 Mar 2019 at 00:06, Graeme Fitzpatrick <<a href="mailto:graemefitz1@gmail.com">graemefitz1@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br clear="all"><div><div dir="ltr" class="gmail-m_-7991508092393794746gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Sun, 3 Mar 2019 at 00:21, Paul Allen <<a href="mailto:pla16021@gmail.com" target="_blank">pla16021@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div></div></div></div></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Sat, 2 Mar 2019 at 08:14, Warin <<a href="mailto:61sundowner@gmail.com" target="_blank">61sundowner@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><br>
So a documented way of including GTFS link in routes?<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Yep.  We could just use url=* </div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>When I've been adding bus stops, I've been using timetable= linked to the GTFS data for that stop eg <a href="https://www.openstreetmap.org/node/6251012182" target="_blank">https://www.openstreetmap.org/node/6251012182</a> links to <a href="https://jp.translink.com.au/plan-your-journey/stops/300772" target="_blank">https://jp.translink.com.au/plan-your-journey/stops/300772</a>, which shows the buses for about the next hour, on both routes that service that stop. That page (which, incidentally, we have explicit permission to use, plus a waiver!) then also links to the full timetable for today & other days.</div></div></div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>That is not the raw GTFS data but a human-readable, active (it uses web 2.0 magic) timetable based</div><div> (presumably) on the GTFS data.<br></div><div> <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>When I've looked at stop info via OSMAND on my phone, the URL is there as a clickable link so it would appear to work?</div></div></div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I'd guess that OSMAND (and the standard carto, which also treats it as a link) is using a heuristic</div><div> along the lines of "If I don't know what the key means AND the value looks like a URL then treat the</div><div> value as a link."  Which is reasonable, but it would be nice to formalize it.  If for no other reason than</div><div>to allow verification tools to know that the value ought to be a link to a working web page and that</div><div>they should check it.<br></div><div><br></div><div>As I said, I'd prefer not to use url=* because it could be for anything - a page about the history of</div><div>the bus stop (maybe the shelter is a listed building), or a timetable or whatever web page the</div><div> mapper happened to think relevant.  I'd prefer to distinguish between a human-readable timetable</div><div>and raw GTFS data (not really human-readable but could be parsed by an app).  For lack of anything</div><div>better, I'd be happy with timetable=* and gtfs=* but I expect somebody will be along shortly to explain</div><div>why those are a very bad idea.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Whatever we go for, we have to cater to the fact that a particular route may have more than one</div><div>operator (I'm not talking about super-routes here).  Around here there are many small local operators,</div><div>and longer routes sometimes split the service between two operators (i.e., the route X to Y might</div><div>be split between an operator based in X and another operator based in Y).  In the cases where this</div><div>has happened one of those operators produced a timetable showing all of the services irrespective</div><div>of the operator whilst the other operator's timetable showed only its own services.  Since the route</div><div>was subsidized by local gov't, there was also a council timetable.  Actually, the route was between</div><div>locations in two counties, so there were probably two council timetables.  But there could have been</div><div>only two operator timetables that showed only their own services on that route.  So maybe we need</div><div>timetable:operator=link.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Further complication if we want to add this information to bus stops as well as routes.  An app</div><div>ought to be capable of finding the route from a query about a stop and then getting the appropriate</div><div>timetable.  But using the query tool provided by standard carto may require more smarts than many</div><div>data consumers have, so adding the timetable to stops would be nice.  But stops can be used by</div><div>more than one route.  So then we'd need timetable:route-number:operator=link.</div><div><br></div><div>I'm hoping somebody will come up with a better tagging scheme...</div><div><br></div><div>-- <br></div><div>Paul</div><div><br></div></div></div>