<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Sun, 10 Mar 2019 at 18:45, Sergio Manzi <<a href="mailto:smz@smz.it">smz@smz.it</a>> wrote:</div><div dir="ltr"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
  
    
  
  <div bgcolor="#FFFFFF">no problem maintaing the currently defined terminology "prison"
      and "operator", for me: as I said it was a bit of hair splitting
      and as I hit the send button I also asked myself if maybe "jail"
      was an americanism (<i>I'm Italian, I spent some time in the US
        but very little time in the UK...</i>).<br></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>The prison/jail distinction tends to be an American thing.  In the UK they mean the same</div><div>thing and police stations (if they have detention facilities at all) have cells, not jails.  From what</div><div>I've dug up so far, it seems only the US has this distinction.<br></div></div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">In researching this answer I also found that (according to Wiktionary) "gaol" used to be the preferred</div><div class="gmail_quote">spelling in the UK and Australia until Monopoly came along and used the American spelling even</div><div class="gmail_quote">in those two countries.</div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">-- <br></div><div class="gmail_quote">Paul</div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div></div>