<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Sun, 17 Mar 2019 at 08:55, s8evq <<a href="mailto:s8evq@runbox.com">s8evq@runbox.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">... What about route=bicycle. The same problem exists there for a lot of the network=lcn routes. But the wiki doesn't mention anything. I think the same logic applies there, or not?<br></blockquote><div> </div><div>
<div>oneway=yes for bicycle|foot|other routes to indicate that the 
signposting is only easily visible in one direction is stretching the definition of "oneway", if not wrong.</div><div>oneway is an access tag (see <a href="https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Oneway">https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Oneway</a>  where it says "The <b>oneway</b> tag is used to indicate the access restriction on <a href="https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Highway" class="gmail-mw-redirect" title="Highway">highways</a> and other linear features as appropriate.") and access tags are about legal access (see <a href="https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Key:access">https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Key:access</a> where it says "
<b>Access values</b> are used to describe the <b>legal</b> access...")</div><div>Riding
 a bicycle route against the flow, risking not seeing the signs is not 
illegal, it's just less convenient unless you know the route anyway.</div><div>I
 had a quick look at the use of "network=lcn" AND "oneway=yes" on 
relations and found it's used a bit in Belgium, some ten cases in NL, 
Germany, Austria, one in France, none in Italy, UK, USA</div><div>Overall it seems limited in use and could easily be corrected by hand when a better solution has been agreed.</div><div><br></div><div>Volker</div> 

<br></div></div></div></div></div>