<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Tue, 25 Jun 2019 at 11:28, Philip Barnes <<a href="mailto:phil@trigpoint.me.uk">phil@trigpoint.me.uk</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><br>
<br>
On Tuesday, 25 June 2019, Colin Smale wrote:<br>
> On 2019-06-25 11:33, John Sturdy wrote:<br>
> <br>
> > For the "socket" key: I suggest putting the current rating onto the cee_blue sockets (cee_blue_16a, cee_blue_32a, etc) rather than limiting it to one rating; this will also make it consistent with the cee_red_* sockets.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>This is better done with socket:type:current, which is already documented.<br></div><div> <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
> Not to forget that the rating is a maximum for safety, related to the<br>
> construction of the sockets. There is no guarantee you can actually get<br>
> 16A/32A (without tripping something) as the distribution network is<br>
> likely to be over-committed, isn't it<br>
<br>
Typically campsites limit the current to 5 or 10A. Our favourite French site fits the  circuit breaker for the current  you have paid for. <br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>A fair point.  The connector designation is not about the current you get but the physical</div><div> diameter of the contacts and thus the maximum current it is rated for.  A 16A connector</div><div> has 5mm pins (6mm for earth pin) and a 32A connector has 6mm pins (8mm for earth pin).</div><div>The pins for 16A and 32A versions are on circles of different diameters.  You can't physically stick a</div><div>16A CEE 17 blue plug into a 32A CEE 17 blue socket.  Specifying CEE 17 blue without specifying</div><div>the rated current may result in some disappointments.  Specifying the available current would</div><div>also be useful.<br></div><div><br></div><div>I've just had a look at <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEC_60309">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEC_60309</a> and it turns out that "blue" doesn't</div><div>even mean what we think it means.</div><div><br></div><div>"Blue" doesn't mean single phase.  You can get 3-phase + earth and 3-phase + neutral + earth</div><div>variants.</div><div><br></div><div>"Blue" doesn't mean 200-250 VAC.  The 3-phase + neutral + earth variant is used for both</div><div>120-144 VAC and 208-250 VAC.<br></div><div><br></div><div>-- <br></div><div>Paul</div><div><br></div></div></div>