<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Thu, 15 Aug 2019 at 02:09, Warin <<a href="mailto:61sundowner@gmail.com">61sundowner@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
  
    
  
  <div bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    <div class="gmail-m_7937585199138971333moz-cite-prefix">On 15/08/19 09:37, Paul Allen wrote:</div><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>Around the outskirts of my town there are also several
            footpaths which, at least in part, go</div>
          <div> across fields.  Again, not walking routes, just short
            cuts.  They could probably be incorporated</div>
          <div>into walking routes but, as far as I know, nobody has
            done so.<br>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    
    Are these 'signed' routes? If not then they fail that test for a
    'route'. <br></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Depends what you mean by "signed route."  Public footpaths across fields usually have</div><div>a fingerpost with an icon of a walking man, or the words "public footpath" or both.</div><div>Bridleways usually have a fingerpost with an icon of somebody riding a horse.  There</div><div>may be waymarkers where the route deviates and isn't obvious.  Actually, modern</div><div>signage at the start of a footpath is a waymark rather than a finger post.  It is rare</div><div>for a public footpath sign to state a destination.  Oh, and usage is not harmonized</div><div>between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.</div><div><br></div><div>Do hiking and walking routes have to have explicit signage?  I know of some walks</div><div>that do not.  The group "Cilgerran Walkers are Welcome" have documented three of</div><div>their walks on the intertoobz and say they're going to document more.  There is a map</div><div> of all the walks on a notice board in the village.  Copyright reasons mean I have mapped</div><div> only one of those walks, where one of the members and I sat down at a public computer</div><div> and mapped it from her memory (she has a far better memory for details than I do).</div><div>The group have been considering letting me map the rest of the routes for over a year now,</div><div> and still can't decide.  The one route I mapped does not have any signage identifying</div><div>it, other than public footpath signs in a few places.  See</div><div><a href="http://walkingcilgerran.btck.co.uk/Walksinthearea">http://walkingcilgerran.btck.co.uk/Walksinthearea</a><br></div><div bgcolor="#FFFFFF"> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div bgcolor="#FFFFFF">Yes.. 'something better' is always useful. I do like the footwear as
    a guide, but not as a rule. <br></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>This is OSM.  There are no rules.  Even so, I have no objection to explicitly stating it's a</div><div>rule of thumb rather than a hard rule.</div><div><br></div><div>In any case, the footwear thing baffles me.  Several years ago I worked at a place where,</div><div>after I got off the bus, I had a walk of about a mile to get there.  It was an unclassified road,</div><div>but it had an asphalt surface and was free from potholes.  No pavement/causeway/</div><div>sidewalk.  One of my cow-orkers said I ought to get some walking shoes to walk</div><div>along it.  I looked down and concluded I must have bought "standing around" shoes</div><div>by mistake and they were not intended for walking in.  My bad.</div><div><br></div><div>-- <br></div><div>Paul</div><div><br></div></div></div>