<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br clear="all"><div><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature">Andy Townsend <<a href="mailto:ajt1047@gmail.com">ajt1047@gmail.com</a>>:<br></div></div></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">Peter Elderson wrote:<br>
> Warin <<a href="mailto:61sundowner@gmail.com" target="_blank">61sundowner@gmail.com</a>> het volgende geschreven<br>
><br>
>> I think;<br>
>> Those who bicycle know why there needs to be these classes.<br>
>> Those who don't ride a bicycle regularly see no need for these classes.<br>
> I wonder which of these groups you think I am in...<br>
><br>
> Hint: Nederland.<br>
<br>
Ahem.  How can I put this tactfully - the Netherlands doesn't exactly <br>
have the widest variety of cycling terrain in the world, and has a <br>
generally good network of separated cycleways. <br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>You would be surprised... but that wasn't the issue. THe examples show no extrapordinary  ways or routes. Characteristics of ways in a route are tagged on the way, such as surface, elevation, speed, access, oneway. Characteristics of the whole route are tagged on the relation. I would only create a route relation for a route that's actually visible, i.e. waymarked. For bicycles we have route=bicycle, for mtb we have route=mtb. Chracterizing routes as especially suited for or designated as touristic or speed cycling, if that was a common thing visible on the ground, no problem. I am sure examples can be found. I am not sure it is enough to warrant tagging. </div><div>On the other hand, if someone or a group of cyclists intend to tag the visible or obvious (?)  purpose(s) of routes in a particular country in more detail, and makes a nice special interest map of it, fine! I would not expect random mappers around the globe to map it, though.</div></div></div>