<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Mon, 8 Jun 2020 at 15:40, Mateusz Konieczny via Tagging <<a href="mailto:tagging@openstreetmap.org">tagging@openstreetmap.org</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
  
    
  
  <div><br><div>Jun 8, 2020, 16:11 by <a href="mailto:pla16021@gmail.com" target="_blank">pla16021@gmail.com</a>:<br></div><blockquote style="border-left:1px solid rgb(147,163,184);padding-left:10px;margin-left:5px"><div dir="ltr"><div><div><div><br></div><div>There may be other indicators of older lines: <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stone_sleepers_at_Bugsworth_basin_-_geograph.org.uk_-_450090.jpg" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stone_sleepers_at_Bugsworth_basin_-_geograph.org.uk_-_450090.jpg</a><br></div></div></div></div></blockquote><div>Not sure whatever I am understanding description correctly - it is part<br></div><div>of railway infrastructure for narrow gauge rail pulled by horses, right?<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I'm not sure if I understand all of the description, either.  Stone sleepers</div><div>like that are typical of a narrow-gauge rail where horses or ponies were the</div><div>motive power: wooden sleepers would have presented an uneven surface</div><div>for them to walk on, so they walked between stones instead.  Usually</div><div>such railways were put in place for hauling minerals from workings, but</div><div>might have later been adapted for other uses.<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div><div></div><blockquote style="border-left:1px solid rgb(147,163,184);padding-left:10px;margin-left:5px"><div dir="ltr"><div><div><div>Also, it is common in my part of the world for older roads, bridleways,<br></div><div>railways, some farm tracks and even some footpaths to have tree-lined<br></div><div>hedges.  They're obvious from aerial imagery, although it may not always<br></div><div>be apparent what type of way they enclose.<br></div></div></div></div></blockquote><div>If anyone finds image on Wikimedia Commons - please link it here (or just add it to a wiki)<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>If somebody wants to pay my passage on SpaceX and can loan me a P900, I'll</div><div>try to take a photo for you. :)  Alternatively, use an editor to look at</div><div><a href="https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/31982354#map=16/52.0511/-4.6189">https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/31982354#map=16/52.0511/-4.6189</a></div><div>especially the section south of Llwyncelyn (look at both the Bing and Maxar</div><div>imagery. one gives distinct tree-lined hedges and the other shows the surface of</div><div>the way).<br></div><div><br></div><div>Other indications of former railways are bridges.  There is a typical</div><div>style for older railway bridges in the UK that makes them recognisable</div><div>as such: <a href="https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3057076">https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3057076</a></div><div>The line that bridge once served is now the Western Approach Road in</div><div>Edinburgh and the bridge is here:</div><div> <a href="https://www.openstreetmap.org/?mlat=55.94094&mlon=-3.22382#map=19/55.94094/-3.22382">https://www.openstreetmap.org/?mlat=55.94094&mlon=-3.22382#map=19/55.94094/-3.22382</a></div><div>The first time you see what is obviously a railway bridge with road traffic on it is</div><div>a little disconcerting (well, it was for me).<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div><div></div><blockquote style="border-left:1px solid rgb(147,163,184);padding-left:10px;margin-left:5px"><div dir="ltr"><div><div><div>What, in principle, are the differences between historic maps, a website documenting that a route has been constructed over an old railway line <br></div></div></div></div></blockquote></div></blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div><blockquote style="border-left:1px solid rgb(147,163,184);padding-left:10px;margin-left:5px"><div dir="ltr"><div><div><div> and a sign at the start of the route saying that it follows the path of an old railway line?<br></div></div></div></div></blockquote><div>Is it a sole indicator that route follows former railway line?<br></div><div><br></div><div>Then in all cases I think it is a case of <br></div><div>"feature is so gone/degraded that it is no longer identifiable based on survey,<br></div><div>requires import of external data to identify it"<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>But aerial imagery and mapillary imagery are external data.  Armchair mapping</div><div>is not based on a survey either.  As I understand it, the very strict requirement</div><div>of only surveys being permitted in the early days of OSM was to prevent</div><div>people importing copyright data.  Saying that it had to be based on a survey</div><div>was simpler for some people to understand than explaining copyright to</div><div>people determined not to understand copyright (like the guy here a few</div><div>months ago determined to use copyright data to map watercourses).<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div><div></div><div><br></div><div>I would map it as a property of route (follows_former_railway=yes or something)<br></div><div>if I would want to map that,</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>The only issue I would have with that is the impact on OpenRailwayMap.  I'm</div><div>not a railway enthusiast and I've never been a train spotter, but they're a</div><div>community that makes use of that data.  I suspect they're also a community</div><div>who do the most to maintain the active rail network in OSM,  Do we gain</div><div>more by removing a very small amount of unnecessary information, or</div><div>chaning how it is tagged, than we lose by annoying them enough that they</div><div> lose interest in mapping or move to a different solution?  I know that's not</div><div>a good argument for various reasons, but it is something we should bear</div><div> in mind.<br></div><div><br></div><div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">  cycleway route is verifiable, but route took by army is not)<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Quite a few motor roads in the UK follow those "unverifiable" routes.  Some</div><div>are even named after those routes.  <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watling_Street">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watling_Street</a></div></div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div>I think that for "Here railway is gone without any clearly identifiable trace in</div><div> terrain." case it is OK to have  "should not be mapped and can be deleted if <br></div></blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div>mapped." ("can be deleted" was just changed from "should be")<br></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>That's an improvement.  I'm tempted to say that it should suggest contacting</div><div>the original mapper before deleting, as the original mapper may be able to</div><div>provide evidence of identifiable trace.  But I'm also tempted not to, because</div><div>I know that such a conversation is likely to degenerate into "I want it" versus</div><div>"You're not having it."<br></div><div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div>Also - it is OK to have<br></div><div><a href="https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/File:Galeria_Kazimierz.JPG" target="_blank">https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/File:Galeria_Kazimierz.JPG</a><br></div><div>example with<br></div><div>"Location of a former railway and railway station without any<br></div><div>traces whatsoever. Not mappable."<br></div><div>?<br></div></blockquote>  </div><div><br></div><div>It's back to what you consider traces.  I wouldn't map a station building which</div><div>has been demolished and built over.  OTOH, the razed railway that went past it</div><div>aids understanding why the address of the building is "Station Yard" and it's</div><div>on "Station Road."</div><div><br></div><div>-- <br></div><div>Paul</div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"> </blockquote></div></div>