<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Mon, 15 Jun 2020 at 10:29, Johannes Werner via Tagging <<a href="mailto:tagging@openstreetmap.org">tagging@openstreetmap.org</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
  
    
  
  <div><br><div>cable=yes/no/length seems like a great idea. It does however not solve OPs problem that a cable is not a socket.<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>However, a cable at a charging station will have a connector at the free end.</div><div>The cable does not end with bare wires.</div><div><br></div><div>The question then is how to designate that connector.  Is it a plug or a socket?</div><div>The answer is not as clear as many think.  See</div><div><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_connector#Plug_and_socket_connectors">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_connector#Plug_and_socket_connectors</a></div><div><br></div><div>Despite what the Wikipedia article says, the terminology isn't as clear-cut as</div><div>it implies and different industries have different, conflicting naming</div><div>conventions.  Within a single industry different naming conventions may be</div><div>applied to different styles of connectors.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Some go by the contact type, with males contacts being plugs and female</div><div> contacts being sockets, but hermaphroditic connectors and mixed-contact</div><div> connectors complicate things.  Some go by fixed vs free, with fixed connectors</div><div>being jacks and free connectors being plugs, but by that convention a standard</div><div>power extension lead has two plugs, but one of those two plugs looks like</div><div>a wall socket except it's not fixed to a wall.</div><div><br></div><div>Where a coupling mechanism is involved, such as the coupling ring on</div><div>a circular connector, some industries will refer to the connector with</div><div>the coupling ring as a plug and the connector it mates with as a socket.</div><div>The connector with the coupling ring is always free, the mating connector</div><div>may be fixed or free.<br></div><div><br></div>That's just scratching the surface.  Is the connector at the end of the cable</div><div class="gmail_quote">a plug or a jack or a socket or a free receptacle or something else?  It depends</div><div class="gmail_quote">what the specification for that particular type of connector (such as</div><div class="gmail_quote"> Chademo) calls it.</div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">It's probably safer to tag the connector type (Chademo, etc.) and not try</div><div class="gmail_quote">to decide whether it's a plug or socket or receptacle or jack.  If</div><div class="gmail_quote">cable=yes/length is given then that connector is on the end of a</div><div class="gmail_quote">cable.</div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">-- <br></div><div class="gmail_quote">Paul</div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div></div>