<div dir="ltr"><div>Grrrr.  The keyboard on this laptop is annoying.  To finish an unfinished message...</div><div><br></div>On Sat, 20 Jun 2020 at 14:40, Paul Allen <<a href="mailto:pla16021@gmail.com">pla16021@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Sat, 20 Jun 2020 at 14:31, Christoph Hormann <<a href="mailto:osm@imagico.de" target="_blank">osm@imagico.de</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">> loan words.  Qanat IS a word that appears in English dictionaries and it IS<br>
> the British English name for such structures.<br>
<br>
That might be the case here - but only because English speakers have started communicating about this kind of thing using that term quite a long time ago.  This is not the case for elements of the geography outside of English speaking countries that English speakers have no broad awareness of (of which there are plenty).<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Yeah, but Britain imposed its imperial colonialism upon much of the world, so</div><div>we've been using local words for a lot of geographical features for a long time.</div><div><br></div><div>As for terms we don't already know, the tendency in English would be to adopt</div><div>the local word if we found a need to refer to it.</div><div><br></div><div>A bigger problem, I think, is a tendency<br></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>... for us to force round pegs into square holes.  It's not just that the locals</div><div>give it a different name, it is actually different.  Like insisting that a qanat is</div><div>just an underground canal.<br></div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
> We should definitely map things that do not physically occur in<br>
> English-speaking parts of the world.  But we should use the British English<br>
> name (which may or may not have been derived from the local name) to tag<br>
> them.<br>
<br>
That would mean giving up on the goal of creating the best map of the world through collection of local knowledge of the geography and replacing it with the goal of creating a map of the world as it is perceived my English speakers.<br></blockquote></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Erm, nope, I didn't say that.  I said that if British English has a name for something</div><div>then we should use it.  I didn't say that we should force square pegs into</div><div>round holes.  To me it isn't whether it's called a qanat or an</div><div>Undergroundwatertransfersystemfedfromawellandwithverticalmaintenanceshafts</div><div>(as it might be named in some languages) but what it actually is.  A qanat is</div><div>more than just an underground canal whatever we call it, and deserves to be</div><div>tagged differently.</div><div><br></div><div>-- <br></div><div>Paul</div><div><br></div></div></div>