<html><head><meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body dir="auto"><br><br><div dir="ltr">sent from a phone</div><div dir="ltr"><br><blockquote type="cite">On 26. Jun 2020, at 12:52, Paul Allen <pla16021@gmail.com> wrote:<br><br></blockquote></div><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div>A lot of the UK's sewer network is old.  Like a qanat, it channels water and</div><div>has vertical shafts.  Little of that network, except some of the very first</div><div>sewers in the UK, is of historical significance.</div></div></blockquote><br><div><br></div><div>according to WP the London sewer system was developed from the late 19th century on. This is not “old” in a historic sense, looking at a city that has thousands of years of history. I don’t know about the rest of the country but I would suspect that it wasn’t ahead of London. Historic is of course relative, as is old. A 2 years old car is still quite new, 3 months old milk is quite old ;-)</div><div>A car from the 1920ies could likely be considered historic in any state, even as a wrack. Any water supplying infrastructure that is older than 100-200 years is likely historic anywhere in the world. Show me some ruins that are older than a few hundred years and are not “historic” but “just old”. It depends on the thing.</div><div><br></div><div>All this becomes even more relative if you look at actual usage of the historic key in OpenStreetMap :</div><div><a href="https://taginfo.openstreetmap.org/keys/historic#values">https://taginfo.openstreetmap.org/keys/historic#values</a></div><div><br></div><div>Cheers Martin </div></body></html>