<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Sun, 28 Jun 2020 at 18:22, Martin Koppenhoefer <<a href="mailto:dieterdreist@gmail.com">dieterdreist@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div dir="ltr"><br><div dir="ltr"><blockquote type="cite">On 28. Jun 2020, at 17:11, Paul Allen <<a href="mailto:pla16021@gmail.com" target="_blank">pla16021@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br><br></blockquote></div><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div> Some cafes in the UK lack table service.  Maybe somebody brings your</div><div>order over after you've placed your order at the counter, maybe your order</div><div>is announced when it is ready and you have to get it yourself, maybe</div><div>you sit down and somebody asks what you want then brings it over</div><div>when it is ready.<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>question is whether we distinguish these places by main type or by subtags.</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Sub-tag, if we distinguish at all.  On general principle.  Because I can spot</div><div>a cafe by looking through the window as I go past but I cannot determine</div><div>the type of service without hanging around or going in.  Sub-tag so extra</div><div>detail can be added later.  Make it a main tag and I have to guess, and may</div><div>guess wrong.<br></div><div> <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div dir="ltr"><div> Is a self service restaurant a restaurant?</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I wouldn't describe self-service as a restaurant.  Restaurants have a larger</div><div>menu, full service and are more expensive than cafes.  Restaurants are</div><div>about experience; cafes are about food.  Bistros (British English usage)</div><div>are small restaurants.<br></div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div dir="ltr"><div>Providing table service or not is a significant difference that gener  merits reflection in tagging (IMHO).</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>By itself, probably not.  But I wouldn't expect to ever find a place in the UK</div><div>calling itself a restaurant but being self-service.  A place where you serve yourself</div><div>is more of a canteen than a cafe.  But cafes range anywhere from "sit down and</div><div>somebody will take your order" to "walk up to the counter, give your order, sit</div><div>down until your order is ready, walk back to the counter to get your order, sit</div><div>down again".  Maybe there is some merit in sub-tagging those.  Oh, and</div><div>that was back in the Before Times, things have probably changed, at least</div><div>for the next year or so.<br></div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div dir="ltr">Cafes sell more than coffee.  Cafes may have<blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div>only one, rather inferior, brand of coffee.</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>maybe in Britain ;-)</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Things have changed even in Britain.  15 years ago it would be rare to find</div><div>a cafe with more than one type of coffee and the choice was with milk or</div><div>without milk.  Now they often have many types of coffee with many additions,</div><div>but I always order "coffee-flavoured coffee" anyway.  Even so, 15 years ago</div><div>with only one type of coffee, it was still a cafe.  50 years ago it may only have</div><div>had tea, but it was still a cafe.<br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div dir="ltr"><div>Bad jokes aside, I recall a discussion on the local mailing list to tag coffee brands, and there are a handful examples in the db: <a href="https://taginfo.openstreetmap.org/search?q=brand%3DLavazza" target="_blank">https://taginfo.openstreetmap.org/search?q=brand%3DLavazza</a></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>There are so many, though.  Even a small (4-person) distributor near me <br></div><div>developed their own blends several years ago and added their own roasting</div><div>machinery (home-built) a couple of years ago.  They supply a lot of cafes</div><div>within about a 30-mile radius.  Are they big enough to deserve their own brand</div><div>in OSM?<br></div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:17px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)">Add a craft=patisserie node. <br></span><div><br></div><div>the scheme for craft is craft=profession so patisserie does not really make sense. </div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>True.  But a foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, according to</div><div>Emmerson. :)<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div dir="ltr"><div><br></div><div>I guess craft=pâtissier is not considered to be English?</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>It's not well-known outside the cognoscenti, is my guess.  But we borrow words</div><div>all the time.  Like "cognoscenti."  Actually, it looks like we already have borrowed</div><div> that one and decided it means "pastry chef."<br></div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div dir="ltr"><div>My dictionary says craft=confectioner does this make sense?</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Confectioners make or sell (usually sell) confections, which are things that</div><div>are rich in sugar.  Divided into bakers' confections (cakes with lots of icing)</div><div>and sugar confections (sweets).  Often, in my experience, applied to</div><div>sweet shops that wish to sound more up-market.  So too ambiguous</div><div>to apply to patissiers.<br></div><div><br></div><div>-- <br></div><div>Paul</div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><br>
</blockquote></div></div>