<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Sun, 28 Jun 2020 at 20:13, Martin Koppenhoefer <<a href="mailto:dieterdreist@gmail.com">dieterdreist@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><br><div dir="ltr"><blockquote type="cite">On 28. Jun 2020, at 19:52, Paul Allen <<a href="mailto:pla16021@gmail.com" target="_blank">pla16021@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></blockquote></div><br><div>it lies in the nature of things that you must know a thing in order to be able to describe it in detail. You say a restaurant which hasn’t table service is not a restaurant (and I am willing to follow), but then you say a cafe is (only/primarily) about the food while a restaurant is about the experience, and here I tend to disagree. It may describe the British situation well, but I would have thought a cafe is also about the experience.</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>In one sense, getting punched in the face is an experience.  But it's not a</div><div>good one and not one most people would pay money for.</div><div><br></div><div>In my experience, restaurants offer a larger menu than cafes.  Restaurant menus</div><div>generally consist of things that take longer to cook than those on cafe menus.</div><div>That means customers spend longer waiting for their meals.  That means the</div><div>seating and ambience needs to be more comfortable or they will be unwilling</div><div>to wait.  All that waiting for the food means lower throughput for the establishment.</div><div>That makes restaurants more expensive to operate.<br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div> You also write a restaurant is more expensive than a cafe, while in my experience they are both at the same level (wrt the same kind of item, naturally a piece of cake is less expensive than a 3 course menu).</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Either you have very expensive cafes or very cheap restaurants. :)  A place</div><div>offering a 3-course menu here is unlikely to call itself a cafe (or be thought of as</div><div>one).<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div>Restaurants have a larger menu, full service and are more expensive than cafes.</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>it may depend on the context/cuisine, there are very good restaurants with a small (changing) selection, because it’s a good way to provide fresh food while a large menu may generally be an indication that things aren’t fresh.</div><div><br></div></div></blockquote><div>This is true.  I should have said that restaurants generally have a larger menu.</div><div>That's because more preparation is involved rather than having pre-cooked food</div><div>on a rotating hot plate.  Cafes are more about fast food with seating (again,</div><div>a generalization).  To over-generalize even further, a cafe is fast food with</div><div>seats.  My local chip shop (fast food) has a seated area (making it a cafe).<br></div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div></div><div>How much of this is a requirement for the OpenStreetMap tag, and how much is just your or my expectation for our respective cultural context? </div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>That is a deep philosophical question embracing several fields of knowledge.  There</div><div>is a distinction between cafe and restaurant that is made in some cultures.  Do we</div><div>need to make that distinction in OSM?  If I were by myself and very hungry I'd</div><div>look for a cafe; if I wanted to impress somebody by taking them for a meal I'd look</div><div> for a restaurant.<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div><br></div><div>Traditionally osm tags tend to be underspecified, and people read into thes <br></div></div></blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div>e tags what they locally expect from the meaning of the word.</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>From my viewpoint, that's not necessarily a good thing.  Not for a global map.</div><div> <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div>E.g. an object tagged as amenity=pub is probably a place where you get something to eat in Britain, in Germany very less so.</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Back when I became old enough to drink in a pub, what you could get to eat consisted of</div><div>bags of salted peanuts and crisps.  Maybe a pickled egg, if you were lucky.  These</div><div dir="auto"> days many, but not all, British pubs serve food.  For some it's hard to decide if they're</div><div dir="auto"> a pub that serves food or a restaurant that serves alcohol.  Generally, if they're happy</div><div>for you to wander in and just drink, it's a pub (especially if they call themselves a</div><div>pub).<br></div><div dir="auto"><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div dir="ltr"><div>Confectioners make or sell (usually sell) confections, which are things that</div></div></div></blockquote></div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div>are rich in sugar.  Divided into bakers' confections (cakes with lots of icing)</div></blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div>and sugar confections (sweets).</div></blockquote></div></blockquote><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">the latter including chocolate I guess?</blockquote><div><br></div><div>Yes.  Chocolates are sweets.  In British English.<br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"> Maybe we should split chocolate from candy?</blockquote><div><br></div><div>Candy is a Merkin term.  British English calls them sweets (but as Merkin</div><div>marketing makes more inroads, that will probably change).  Please don't ask</div><div>me about bread with chocolate in it (I noticed a shop a few miles from me is</div><div>now offering it) as that's a bit of a taxonomic pain.</div><div><br></div><div>-- <br></div><div>Paul</div><div><br></div></div></div></div></div>